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How Whole-Body Cryotherapy Works


Freezing Up
Justin Gatlin celebrates after winning the gold at the 2004 Olympics. Seven years later, he'd experience some nasty cryotherapy-induced skin problems.
Justin Gatlin celebrates after winning the gold at the 2004 Olympics. Seven years later, he'd experience some nasty cryotherapy-induced skin problems.
FRANCK FIFE/AFP/Getty Images

The cryotherapy industry is largely unregulated. But that might change soon. The death of Chelsea Ake-Salvacion was a big wake-up call, but there have been other injuries. As of late 2015, a Texas woman named Alix Gunn was suing a cryotherapy center for freezing her arm. She claims she was given wet gloves to wear during the treatment and that the result was third-degree burns, loss of use and disfigurement. The center, CryoUSA, says Gunn signed a liability waiver and wasn't ensuring her own safety [source: Turkewitz].

But these are hardly the first signs of potential drawbacks to cryotherapy. Back in 2011, sprinter and Olympic-gold-medal-winner Justin Gatlin was training in Orlando, Florida, for the world championships in South Korea. After his Olympic win in 2004, he had been banned from competing for four years for doping. So in 2011 he was determined to come back strong and compete against the new kid on the block, Usain Bolt [source: AP].

At 9 a.m. in Orlando the temperature had already soared to 90 degrees Fahrenheit (32 degrees Celsius), and Gatlin was sweating when he stepped into the cryotherapy booth. His socks, soaked with perspiration, instantly froze to his feet. Frostbite followed [source: AP].

By the time he arrived in Daegu, South Korea, the pus and blisters on his feet were healing, but the fresh scars lined up perfectly with the top of his socks and the back of his running spikes. Hobbled by frostbite from that cyrotherapy session, Gatlin was smoked by Usain Bolt. Gatlin has since returned to form, and in 2015 he ran the year's five fastest 100-meter races [source: Wharton].

In the wake of Ake-Salvacion's death, the state of Nevada has issued new guidelines for those using cryotherapy. For now, these guidelines amount to "suggestions" and are not legal regulations. According to Dr. Tracey Green, Nevada's chief medical officer, the guidelines recommend that cryotherapy users should:

  • Be over 18
  • Be taller than 5 feet (1.5 meters)
  • Have no history of stroke, seizures or high blood pressure
  • Not be pregnant
  • Not have a pacemaker

Further, a single three-minute session per day is the recommended max, and blood pressure should be taken before and after. Cryotherapy centers should have emergency kits, defibrillators and nitrogen monitors, and employees should know CPR. According to the guidelines, centers should also have signs and waivers that explain the risks involved, in addition to the fact that there's no scientific evidence of any health benefits from undergoing a deep freeze [source: Rinkunas].

They could add: Always have somebody hanging around to keep an eye on you — and no wet clothes allowed!


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