Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

10 Jobs that Will Likely Send You to the ER

        Health | ER

9
Logger

The Tin Woodman of Oz came by that body of tin after he chopped off his own limbs with an enchanted axe. Imagine what he would have done with a chainsaw.

Logging is one of the most dangerous jobs in the U.S. There were 40,000 logging injuries recorded in the U.S. in 2007, with medical costs totaling almost $300 million [source: New York State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation].

Chainsaws are part of the danger. If you lose your footing, by slipping in the mud, for example, you don't want to be holding something with moving blades. Most chainsaw injuries occur on the left side of the body: lower leg, thigh, arm and back of the hand, in that order [source: New York State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation].

It's manual felling, or cutting down individual trees, that claims the most loggers' lives [source: New York State Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation]. One chilling term in logger lingo is the widowmaker, a limb that's broken off but still caught in the branches of that or a nearby tree.

Skidding, or transporting the downed trees to the loading area, is the next most dangerous aspect of logging. Dragging an enormous load of fallen trees over terrain is hazardous, as is loading and unloading them from a truck.

Like fishers, loggers often work in cold, remote places regardless of snow, lightning, ice, fog and wind -- and nowhere near medical help.


More to Explore