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Lipozene: What You Need to Know

        Health | Medications

Lipozene Indications
Do you need exercise, diet AND glucomannan to get that scale to move?
Do you need exercise, diet AND glucomannan to get that scale to move?

Lipozene is indicated to be used as a means of losing weight, and it's available without a prescription. How much weight you want to lose will make a difference in how you use Lipozene. If you just want to lose a few pounds, Lipozene's manufacturer recommends taking one capsule, along with an 8 ounce (237 milliliter) glass of water before each meal. Don't skimp on the water -- remember, water is key to getting the glucomannan to expand in your stomach and create a feeling of fullness. If you want to lose more weight, then Lipozene's manufacturer claims that you should take two capsules with water a half hour before each meal. According to its Web site, Lipozene is safe to take at this dosage of six capsules a day.

As we mentioned on the previous page, studies evaluating glucomannan's effectiveness included participants who made changes to their diet and exercise regimen. While Lipozene advertisements have included the claim that no such changes are needed, a Lipozene supervisor reached by phone by Good Morning America in 2008 said that visible results may occur more quickly for people who do make those changes. The supervisor also said that while he hears success stories, he knows that the product doesn't work for everyone interested in weight loss [source: Leamy].

If Lipozene doesn't work for everybody, should they make such incredible claims in their advertisement? As it happens, the company that makes Lipozene has been fined for making unreliable claims about their products before. The Obesity Research Council LLC, the manufacturer of Lipozene, is a private company that in 2005 paid $1.5 million to the Federal Trade Commission for misleading claims about now-defunct products called FiberThin and Propolene [source: FTC]. The Obesity Research Council claimed the products would cause rapid weight loss without any need for diet and exercise, and the FTC found their advertisements to be deceptive, though the Obesity Research Council admitted no wrongdoing in the settlement [source: Leamy]. The products in question featured the same common ingredient: glucomannan.

Besides the possible side effect of being duped, are there any other side effects to worry about?