Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a disabling illness that affects well over one million adults worldwide.

For many sufferers, MS means a lifetime of taking medications that offer little relief for a body that progressively gets worse. Such was the case for Pat Wagner of Waldorf, Md., until her mother suggested that she get stung - by a bee. Pat is now known as the "Bee Lady" for her practice of using bee stings to treat the debilitating symptoms of MS. For Pat, it's been a miracle, one that she's been happily sharing with people from all over the world - by stinging them.

(Editor's Note: The following suggests a therapy that must not be acted upon without the careful coordination of treatment with the patient's primary care doctor and, preferably, an allergist. Bee sting venom can cause anaphylactic shock which can cause sudden death. The risk of shock is unacceptably high to try bee sting therapy without the supervision of an allergist.)

On the next page, learn how bee sting therapy works and find out whether it's right for you.