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Postpartum fatigue is natural, given how hectic your life will become. Find out how relaxation techniques will help you adjust to this special time.
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Being rested enough to enjoy your baby is more important than catching up on chores. See more pictures of staying healthy.

The postpartum period is an exhilarating, exhausting, rewarding, tearful time of discovery. At the end of the 12-month cycle of pregnancy, delivery, and recovery, the physical and psychological aspects of the new mother -- body and mind -- have undergone a tremendous adjustment. Your body underwent an enormous effort to grow and give birth to (and perhaps now feed) your new baby. But you can be on your way to a new and better self! The following pages will show you how to gently ease your way back into a workout routine and regain your prepregnancy figure. In this article, we will show you how to exercise after you give birth, including:

  • The Importance of Rest After Giving Birth
    New mothers and fathers often find that they get only a few hours of sleep at a time for weeks after the baby arrives. These sleep disturbances can make you irritable and depressed, and erode your decision-making skills. Finding time to catch up on sleep is vital for your well-being. This page shows you how to make that happen.

  • Postpartum Exercises
    The good news about exercising after giving birth is that you can start the day of delivery, without even getting out of bed. Your body won't be ready for high-impact workouts for several weeks, but you can still enjoy light physical activity. On this page you'll learn many exercises you can start right away, so that you'll be ready for a stronger workout that much sooner.
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  • When to Begin Postpartum Aerobic Exercises
    It will probably take several months to lose the weight you put on during pregnancy, but starting an aerobic exercise routine will minimize that time. Of course, there are many factors that determine postpartum weight loss, and you should check with a doctor before starting a routine -- especially if you're breast-feeding. But this page will give you some guidelines on what you can do and when you can start doing it.