Bartholin's Glands are part of a woman's internal genitals. They are located on each side of the labia minora (inner lips of the vaginal opening; see vulva), and they secrete small amounts (a drop or two) of fluid when a woman is sexually aroused.

The small drops of fluid were once thought to be important for lubricating the vagina, but the research of Masters and Johnson demonstrated that vaginal lubrication comes from further within the vagina. The fluid may slightly moisten the opening of the vagina (labia), making contact on this sensitive area more comfortable.

The Bartholin's glands can become irritated or infected, resulting in swelling and pain. This unusual condition can be easily treated by a qualified medical professional.

Copyright 2002 Sinclair Intimacy Institute