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10 Aphrodisiac Myths

        Health | Sexuality

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Green M&Ms
If you insist on only eating green M&Ms, you can always go to a specialty candy store where they sell unmixed colors. © Owen Franken/Corbis
If you insist on only eating green M&Ms, you can always go to a specialty candy store where they sell unmixed colors. © Owen Franken/Corbis

Is it true what they say about the green ones?

Sorry to break it to you, but no, it's not true. There is absolutely no evidence — and we mean scientific evidence, not the "evidence" you collected during your teenage years — that green M&Ms have any magical erotic powers. Nor do any other green candies you might enjoy (green jelly beans, green Skittles, green gummi bears, etc.).

Back in the '70s and '80s a rumor started that eating green M&Ms would turn you on; while no one can be sure how or why the myth began, it could be related to the color green's association with fertility throughout history. The only thing special about green M&Ms around the time the myth began was that you could only expect about 10 percent of a package of M&Ms to be green, 20 percent if you were eating peanut M&Ms [source: Snopes]. So it's possible, though not substantiated, that their relative scarcity added to the allure.

Green M&Ms aren't the only color that's been considered a libido-booster, though. When the FDA banned Red Dye No. 2 in the mid-1970s because of its association with certain cancers, rumors swirled that they were unavailable because they were an even better aphrodisiac than the green candies. Also not true.


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