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10 Sex Questions You Might Be Afraid to Ask -- but Should

        Health | Sexuality

6
Why Does Intercourse Hurt?

If sexual intercourse is uncomfortable for you, you're not alone: 30 percent of women report pain during their most recent intercourse [source: Psychology Today]. While the issue of pain during intercourse likely doesn't come up in conversation between women and their doctors, it should: For 10 percent of women, this pain is chronic [source: Psychology Today]. Some women experience pain during all sexual encounters, while others may suddenly have pain after having no previous problems. If intercourse is painful for you (especially if it produces bleeding), talk to your primary-care doctor, gynecologist or urologist as soon as you can.

There are many different causes for painful intercourse. Insufficient lubrication, yeast or bacterial infections, or endometriosis (the growth of uterine lining in other parts of the body) can cause pain, and inflammation of the urethra or thinning of the vaginal walls may be responsible.

Though you should consult with a doctor, you can take some steps to prevent pain during intercourse, including the following:

  • Have more foreplay.
  • Use lubricants.
  • Avoid douching.
  • Don't have vaginal intercourse if you don't want to.
  • Don't have anal sex if you don't want to.
  • Don't use any toys you don't want to use.
  • Try to find a position that works best for you.

Next up, will having sex during pregnancy ruin your unborn child's chances of getting into Harvard?


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