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Aphrodisiacs


Aphrodisiac Herbs

Yohimbine is a substance derived from the bark of the African yohimbe tree that has been reputed to have sexually stimulating properties for men. Studies of yohimbine have found that it has a tendency to enhance erectile functioning relative to placebo in men with erectile difficulties. There have not been consistent reports of yohimbine enhancing sexual desire or arousal. It is more likely to be used as a treatment for erectile dysfunction than as a true aphrodisiac.

Though not generally considered an aphrodisiac, testosterone supplements do affect sexual drive and can be used effectively in some cases of inhibited desire when endogenous levels of testosterone are extremely low. There are, however, negative side effects (especially for women), and such supplements should only be used under a doctor's supervision.

Certainly, it seems reasonable to speculate that various chemicals and other substances might influence the centers of the brain that control sexual response. To date, however, about the only effects that drugs appear to have on sexual behavior are inhibitory rather than enhancing, and most foods believed to be aphrodisiacs have no physical effect at all.

It would appear that most claims about aphrodisiacs are based on myth rather than scientific evidence, making their continued use more a statement about the desperate search for remedies than a tribute to their effectiveness.

Copyright 2002 Sinclair Intimacy Institute


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