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Eyelash Bars


Tokyo Lash Bar
Getting glamorous at the opening of Tokyo Lash Bar in Sydney, Australia
Getting glamorous at the opening of Tokyo Lash Bar in Sydney, Australia
Sergio Dionisio/Stringer/Getty Images

The Tokyo Lash Bar was a smashing success when it opened in the trendiest neighborhood in Tokyo, catering to everyone from the well-dressed wealthy to the teenagers with a little extra spending money. In 2005, Shu Uemura opened a Tokyo Lash Bar in Manhattan, and now, there are Tokyo Lash Bars in several cities around the U.S., as well as other eyelash bars opened by other cosmetics companies.

At a Tokyo Lash Bar, shoppers have dozens of eyelash styles to pick from. Some of the options are simple, realistic looking lashes that may retail for $20 to $30. However, if shoppers are willing to spend a little more, they can choose from jeweled lashes, beaded lashes, glittery lashes, peacock feather lashes or even lashes shaped to cast patterns across the wearer's face. Shu Uemura's 2009 line, for example, included Snow Twist, a lash style made from thin, white wires and dotted with crystals. Meant to emulate snow falling from the sky, Snow Twist retailed for $79 [source: Shu Uemura]. On the lower end of the cost scale, the 2009 line also included Lavender Bloom, which retails for $29 and is made of purple "fur-like materials" [source: Shu Uemura].

Once a shopper has selected his or her lashes (and men do show up to eyelash bars!), then a makeup artist will attach them. And not just once -- false eyelashes can be worn up to eight times, and shoppers need only return to Tokyo Lash Bar for a free re-application. If all those visits to Tokyo Lash Bars have you feeling like an expert, you could purchase the fake lashes and glue and go the do-it-yourself route. However, rumors abound of people gluing their eyelids closed, so when in doubt, head for the eyelash bar.


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