Skin Problems Image Gallery
Skin Problems Image Gallery

Heat rash is common in babies because their pores are small and can get blocked easily. See more pictures of skin problems.

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Being a parent is often considered to be one of the toughest jobs in the world. It seems as though new studies or articles come out on a regular basis telling you about something else you should do or avoid doing to raise the healthiest child possible. But you might look at it this way: Life is too short to sweat the small stuff -- especially when sweating can lead to heat rash.

Heat rash is a relatively common condition, particularly in young children. It usually develops in hot and humid weather when the sweat ducts become blocked and clothing rubs the skin, causing redness and irritation [source: Rauch]. Although annoying and uncomfortable, the good news is that heat rash usually heals on its own in just a few days. More good news (especially for children) -- heat rash is not infectious or contagious.

The best way to reduce the risk of getting heat rash is take preventive measures to avoid it. Babies usually develop heat rash because their parents dress them in too much clothing in hot and humid weather. There is no reason to stay inside when the weather is nice, but it is important to keep your child cool and dry if you want to beat the heat (and the heat rash). Use lightweight, soft clothing in the summer. Another way to avoid heat rash is to keep your child's room cool at night. And try not to overuse powders or creams; these can block pores and lead to heat rash [source: Mayo Clinic]. If your child does end up getting heat rash, find a cool, dry place. The symptoms will quickly subside.

Read on to learn why bundling up in the winter is not always comforting and what the symptoms of heat rash are.