Bacterial Infections

Complications from stasis dermatitis may include bacterial skin infections, such as impetigo and cellulitis. If your skin becomes red, swollen or tender, or if you run a high fever, you should see a doctor because you may need antibiotics [source: Mayo Clinic].

Is There a Cure for Stasis Dermatitis?

Stasis dermatitis is a chronic condition, which means it can recur for the rest of your life. Although there's no cure for the disease, there are several steps you can take to keep it from returning frequently.

People with mild cases of stasis dermatitis can usually improve their health with proper care at home. Doctors may instruct patients to wear elastic support hose or knee-high compression stockings during the day because these help control leg swelling [source: VisualDXHealth]. Other steps that can improve the condition include elevating the legs above the heart while sleeping or sitting, applying topical medications to ulcers or itchy skin, taking walks on a regular basis and avoiding standing for long periods of time [source: American Academy of Dermatology]. People who have weeping wounds, or sores that leak discharge, should apply compresses to the area [source: Merck]. If preventive and reactive measures don't improve the condition, you should see a doctor. A doctor may prescribe steroid medications or diuretics to remove excess fluids [source: Berman].

Vibration therapy is used to treat some medical conditions that result from poor circulation. Read on to see if vibration therapy can treat stasis dermatitis.