Scalp Care

Scalp care can be tricky because the skin in that area is often sensitive. Learn more about scalp care at HowStuffWorks.


Recent findings showed that nearly all U.S.-based lice were drug-resistant. Should we panic, yet?

Say so long to greasy hair. Without showering, dry shampoo can help you hair look healthier and more voluminous. Learn how to use this must-have hair care product.

Get relief from itchy scalp and other scalp problems with these useful ways to prevent and treat this skin condition.

What are the benefits of scalp massages? From mood enhancer to migraine reliever, read on to learn about the benefits of scalp massages.

Scalp fungus can be unpleasant and difficult to treat. But there are things you can do at home to speed up the recovery process.

Usually when you sweat, it's anything but luxurious. But if it's a steam treatment that's bringing on the perspiration, all of that glistening can be part of a healthful, relaxing beauty therapy.

They can be unsightly, uncomfortable and even painful. Fortunately, scalp sores are typically treatable, although a doctor's expertise may be needed.

Nobody likes flakes -- neither the kind with cheesy pick-up lines, nor the sort that fall from a dry, itchy scalp. If you're plagued by the latter, here's a handful of home remedies to help.

Get fast facts on dandruff, and learn about treating a sensitive scalp and how shampoos can help treat and prevent dandruff.

Get fast facts on hair washing, natural hair washing options and the risks involved in shampoo frequency.

If you want your hair to grow, you should get regular trims. Right? Or do stylists rob us blind by insisting that we come before them every six to eight weeks?

Men and women alike have been using wigs, hairpieces and hair extensions for millennia. People have a wealth of hair styling options at their disposal, but will these choices leave them bald?

If you don't have time to suds up your hair in the shower, there's an alternative. But does dry shampoo really make your hair squeaky clean?

Heat may give you a perfect coiffure today, but will it damage your scalp and hair in the long run? How does a hair dryer affect your scalp?

You've probably heard frustrated, angry people exclaim that they're going to tear their hair out. But for people with trichotillomania, that's more than just an idiom.

Many women invest in their hair with regular salon appointments and enough product to fill the Grand Canyon. It's quite a shock to the system when a woman begins to lose her hair. It can definitely hurt your pride, but can it physically hurt as well?

Children are most likely to contract ringworm of the scalp, but anyone can develop this common skin condition. How can you treat it?

Most people wash their hair every day without fail. However, some go without shampoo for weeks, months and even years. Who's right?

You may wonder how you'd look as a redhead or a platinum blonde, but could making that change be risky? Can the chemicals in hair dye damage your scalp?

You may have dry hair, oily hair, thick hair or thinning hair, but can your scalp affect the way your hair looks?

Although your scalp naturally sheds dead skin cells, when noticeable flakes begin appearing in your hair and on your shoulders, you probably have dandruff. But what causes dandruff, and how can you prevent it?

When hair follicles become damaged or clogged they can cause an irritating red rash known as folliculitis. Unfortunately, a common culprit of the condition is a tempting treat -- relaxing in a hot tub. What else can bring on a case of folliculitis?

Head lice are small, wingless parasites that have one main function -- to live on top of your scalp and feed on your blood. As scary as that sounds, the condition is actually easy to treat. How do head lice pass from one person to the next?

Most of us have given our heads a scratch or two at some point, but the causes for itchy scalp vary. Sometimes there's no reason at all, while other times there may be a more serious skin condition behind the itchiness.

Lichen planus, an irritating rash that's reddish or violet in color, can affect anyone, particularly people between the ages of 30 and 60. Is there a cause for this mysterious skin condition, and are there any treatments?