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What are the craziest diet trends of all time?

Fad diets come and go. At first, dieters swear by the new plan, losing weight and feeling good. Then research emerges warning dieters of the dangers involved in excess weight loss or eliminating certain food groups. Finally, testimonials trickle out from unsatisfied dieters who gained the weight back when they completed the diet program or who developed health complications from the fad diet. The healthiest way to maintain weight loss long-term is to eat well-balanced meals, not by experimenting with short-term, extreme fad diets.

To maintain a healthy diet, it’s important to eat foods from the five basic food groups daily: proteins, carbohydrates, vegetables, meat and fat. Each food group is important for your well-being, albeit in the proper proportions. The popular South Beach Diet and Atkins Diet both nearly eliminate carbohydrates from the menu. Although excessive carbohydrates can cause fat buildup, some carbohydrates are necessary to provide energy to fuel your muscles and brain. Another diet, called Master Cleanse, replaces meals with juices in order to cleanse the body of excess fat. However, without actually ingesting solid food, you can develop symptoms, such as diarrhea, dizziness, headaches and bad breath. Furthermore, if you stay on a juice diet long term, you can acquire protein and calcium deficiencies.

Diet products have emerged over the years promising miracle cures for reducing weight, effortlessly. In the 1920s, overweight customers were promised immediate fat reduction by washing their body with “miracle soap.” The tapeworm diet is another example of how people tried to lose weight without altering their eating habits. Dieters mistakenly believed that if they ingested a tapeworm, it would eat away at their excess fat from within their body. Unfortunately it has been proven extremely risky and causes undesirable side effects. Another painless weight loss method is the vibrating belt that was introduced by a Swedish doctor in the 1950s. The belt supposedly rids you of excess pounds and inches by securing around your waist and vibrating.