Americans love to drink their calories. In fact, Dr. Jessica Bartfield, MD, medical weight-loss specialist at Gottlieb Memorial Hospital told Science Daily, "10 percent of overweight adults consume 450 calories of sugar sweetened beverages per day, which is three times that of an average American. Cutting 450 calories per day would lead to about a 1 pound per week weight loss, close to 50 pounds in one year."

Can you imagine getting 450 calories a day from soda? That's nearly a third of my daily caloric recommendation.

But the fact of the matter is that it's easier than you think to make this mistake. Twenty ounce bottles of soda list the amount of calories and sugar per serving but often there are more than two servings per bottle. Your average 20 ounce bottle can have 450 calories right there. One serving is an 8 ounce can and now you can also buy the mini servings at about 100 calories a pop.

But this is all changing, according to an article on Science Daily. The front labels of packaged beverages now include the total number of calories in containers of 20 ounces or less.

"Beverage containers traditionally 'hid' the nutritional content at the back in a small square with small print and cleverly listed just the calorie content per serving," Dr. Bartfield said.