Aromatherapy Immune System Boost

Immune Tonic Blend

  • 6 drops lavender oil
  • 6 drops bergamot oil
  • 3 drops lemon oil
  • 3 drops tea tree oil
  • 2 drops myrrh oil (expensive, so optional)
  • 2 ounces vegetable oil

Combine ingredients. Use as a general massage oil or over specific areas of the body that tend to develop physical problems. For example, if you come down with a lot of chest colds and flus, rub this blend over your chest. Use 1 to 2 teaspoons in a bath or 1 teaspoon in a foot bath. Without the vegetable oil, this recipe is suitable for use in an aromatherapy diffuser, simmering pan of water, or potpourri cooker. Use in some form several times a day when trying to build up your own natural immunity.

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How to Treat a Weak Immune System With Aromatherapy

Many essential oils have a remarkable ability to both support the immune system and increase one’s rate of healing. Some of these same essential oils are also powerful antiseptics. One way these oils fight infection is to stimulate the production of white corpuscles, which are part of the body’s immune defense. Still other essential oils encourage new cell growth to promote faster healing. As an extra bonus, the regenerative properties of these essential oils improve the condition and tone of the skin. All can be used in conjunction with herbal remedies designed to improve immunity. Relaxation achieved through a massage or bath lowers stress, improves sleep, and thus stimulates the immune system. (For more information, see the article on Aromatherapy Stress Relief for additional treatments that can be part of your immune therapy.)

One important way to assist your immune system is a lymphatic massage that uses essential oils. Lymph nodes are located around the body, particularly in the throat, groin, breasts, and under the arms. They are like filtering centers for cleansing the blood. The lymphatic system moves cellular fluid through the system, cleansing the body of waste produced by the body’s metabolic functions. Lemon, rosemary, and grapefruit are especially good at stimulating movement and supporting the cleansing action. A lymphatic massage involves deep strokes that work from the extremities toward the heart. You can even do this on yourself. Rub the oil up your arms to the lymph nodes in your armpits. From the center of your chest, rub again toward the armpit, and then down your neck. Massage your legs from your feet up to the groin.

Essential oils for the immune system: bergamot, grapefruit, lavender, lemon, myrrh, rosemary, tea tree, thyme

To learn more about Aromatherapy and other alternative medicines, see:

  • Aromatherapy: Here you will learn about aromatherapy, how it works, what part essential oils play, and how to use aromatherapy.
  • Essential Oils Profiles: We have collected profiles of dozens of plants that are used to produce essential oils. On these pages, you will learn the properties and preparations for the most popular essential oils.
  • How to Treat Common Conditions With Aromatherapy: Aromatherapy can be used to treat a number of conditions, from asthma to depression to skin problems. Here you will learn how to treat some common medical problems with aromatherapy.
  • Home Remedies: We have gathered over a hundred safe, time-tested home remedies for treating a wide variety of medical complaints yourself.
  • Herbal Remedies: Herbal remedies and aromatherapy can be very similar, and they stem from similar historic roots. On this page, you will find all of our herb profiles and instructions for treating medical problems with herbal remedies.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Kathi Keville is director of the American Herb Association and editor of the American Herb Association Quarterly newsletter. A writer, photographer, consultant, and teacher specializing in aromatherapy and herbs for over 25 years, she has written several books, including Aromatherapy: The Complete Guide to the Healing Art and Pocket Guide to Aromatherapy, and has written over 150 articles for such magazines as New Age Journal, The Herb Companion, and New Herbal Remedies.

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors of Consumer Guide (R), Publications International, Ltd., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.