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Traditional Chinese Medical Treatments


The Energetics of Foods

Chinese medicine recognizes that foods have an innate temperature that can warm or cool the body, much the same way herbs can. The food we eat can have a profound positive or negative effect on healing.

For example, the condition of a person with chronic inflammation due to heat arising from yin deficiency is more likely to improve if this person eats cooling, moistening foods such as lettuce, cucumbers, and mung beans.

On the other hand, if he or she eats warming, drying foods such as chicken with ginger and onions, the condition will be more difficult to resolve, even if the person is taking cooling herbs. Since they don't affect the body's interior climate, neutral foods are appropriate in most situations.

The charts that follow list foods that have different innate temperatures.

Cold

Banana
Tomato Crab
Grapefruit
Seaweed Kelp
WatermelonClam Salt
Persimmon

Cool

Apple
Tangerine
Orange
Pear
Strawberry
Eggplant
Cucumber
Lettuce
Radish
Spinach
Barley
Mung bean
Tofu
Wheat
Sesame oil
Peppermint


Neutral

Fig
Grape
Olive
Papaya
Pineapple
Plum
Peanut
Cabbage
Carrot
Celery
Beet
Corn
Potato
Sweet potato
Pumpkin
Shiitake mushroom
Yam
Green beans
Rice
Soybean
Beef
Milk
Egg
Pork
Carp
Oysters
Honey
White sugar


Warm

Cherry
Coconut
Guava
Date
Peach
Raspberry
Chestnut
Walnut
Chive
Asparagus
Green onion
Leek
Onion
Squash
Mustard greens
Malt syrup
Sweet rice
Mutton
Chicken
Mussel
Shrimp
Vinegar
Wine
Coffee
Brown sugar
Fresh ginger
Fennel
Basil
Dill
Garlic
Clove
Nutmeg
Coriander
Rosemary
Spearmint

Hot

Soybean
Cinnamon
Dried ginger
Black pepper
Red pepper

Determining which traditional Chinese medical treatments, whether dietary or otherwise, are right for which ailments requires training and experience. For information on finding a qualified practitioner, see the next section of this article.

For more about traditional Chinese medicine, treatments, cures, beliefs, and other interesting topics, see:

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors of Consumer Guide (R), Publications International, Ltd., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.