Not So Fast, Young Bloods

In 2009, Maryland lawmakers started taking steps to ban the sale of horny goat weed products to citizens under the age of 18. These politicians were concerned that the products endangered customers who didn't take them properly. Some lawmakers, citing the lack of FDA regulation and potential dangers, also considered expanding the ban to include all supplements [source: Hager].

Horny Goat Weed for Women

So far, we've focused mainly on the effects of horny goat weed on men, but the supplement may have benefits for women, too. The supplement is reported to help men raise their sex drive, and it might affect women's desires as well [source: Reedy].

But there's a chance the effects of horny goat weed will go beyond the boundaries of the bedroom. As discussed previously, horny goat weed may help people who have hay fever or atherosclerosis, although studies on these conditions haven't produced conclusive evidence yet [source: Blue Shield of California]. And it doesn't end there.

Another suspected use for horny goat weed is to help protect against one of the most common conditions of aging women -- osteoporosis [sources: Blue Shield of California, Reedy]. For women, especially those who are aging or going through menopause, this loss of bone density is a big concern. Another added bonus is that the supplement may offer some relief from the many symptoms of menopause.

Horny goat weed has a name you'll probably never forget. And if you suffer from any of the ailments or conditions it claims to treat, you may have come across a helpful supplement. But as with any supplement, exercise caution, since it under-studied and unregulated.

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