©2007 Publications International, Ltd. The symptoms of motion sickness can include sweating, light-headedness, hyperventilation, nausea, and vomiting.

Oh that queasy feeling, when the world just won't stop swaying, bobbing, or just plain moving. No matter what the mode of transport, the result can be motion sickness. While many experts believe there may be a genetic tendency involved, they aren't exactly sure why some people get sick from riding in a car, boat, plane, or train, while others don't. If you do, you're not alone. Motion sickness caused some pilots to drop out of training during World War II. And to this day, NASA astronauts struggle to combat this side effect of space travel.

Normally, the eyes, inner ears (which contain fluid that sloshes around in reaction to movement), skin, and muscles send sensory information to the brain that allows it to determine the body's position in space and to track whether and in what direction you are moving. Motion sickness is believed to occur when this balancing system gets overwhelmed by contradictory messages sent from the eyes and inner ears. The resulting symptoms of motion sickness can include sweating, light-headedness, hyperventilation, nausea, and vomiting.

For some people, the symptoms of motion sickness can be brought on merely by walking down the aisles in a supermarket or watching telephone poles whipping by a car window. Some people can even get motion sickness sitting in a theater and watching an action-packed film on one of those super-sized movie screens.

With a few simple steps, you may be able to prevent motion sickness from developing in the first place or help quell your queasiness once it's begun. Read the next page for helpful home remedies.

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