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5 Causes of Consistent Cavities


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How Poor Hygiene Can Cause Consistent Cavities
Good oral hygiene may reduce your risk of cavities, which is definitely something to smile about.
Good oral hygiene may reduce your risk of cavities, which is definitely something to smile about.
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OK, before you skip ahead because you already know this, consider that the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommends that a child should begin an oral hygiene regimen before they even have teeth.

Now the result of bad oral hygiene doesn't begin and end with cavities, so there are a few things besides rotting teeth to consider when assessing your own habits. Bad breath along with stained or crooked teeth may be hallmarks of bad hygiene. In fact, gum disease has been linked to more serious health problems including heart disease and stroke. So regular, quality hygiene could save you from a lot more than the drill.

The longer sugar and acids stay on your teeth after meals, the longer the corrosive acids have to work on enamel. And as we mentioned earlier, once enamel is gone it is lost forever.

Fortunately, this part is easier than giving up certain foods. Brushing and flossing, coupled with regular appointments with The One We Do Not Speak Of, is usually enough to keep cavities at bay. Brushing after every meal (remember the 30-minute rule), or at least twice daily, is a good place to start. This clears the mouth of food and bacteria so the acids don't get a chance to build up. Flossing should happen once a day and this will clean the places your toothbrush can't reach. Flossing is also beneficial for healthy gums, which help your teeth remain in place.

So far we've looked at different behavioral factors that can cause recurring cavity formation, but what role does genetics play? Keep reading and find out how we can thank mom and dad for our cavities.


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