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Dental Bridges


Dental Bridge Procedure
After a dentist makes mold of your mouth using a soft putty, it's sent to a lab so that the bridge can be manufactured.
After a dentist makes mold of your mouth using a soft putty, it's sent to a lab so that the bridge can be manufactured.
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As with all bridges (large or small), the key to success is planning, which in this case, means a visit to your dentist. He or she will evaluate your overall dental health and decide whether or not you're a good candidate. If your gums and teeth are in reasonably good health and no gum disease is present, your dentist will green light you for the bridge procedure.

In creating a fixed or cantilevered bridge, the dentist first numbs your mouth in the area where the bridge will eventually be inserted. He then prepares the teeth that will anchor the bridge, which usually involves shaving them down so that the crowns will fit over them. If the teeth are in poor shape, however, he might need to first build them up.

Once the teeth are prepared (which is not necessary for a resin-bonded bridge), the dentist will take a mold of your mouth using a soft putty. This mold is then sent off to a lab so that the bridge can be manufactured. In the meantime, the dentist will fit you with a temporary bridge to protect the exposed teeth and gums. When the permanent bridge is ready, you will return to the dentist's office, the temporary bridge will be removed and the permanent one set in place with super-strong cement.


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