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Find Your Reason to Quit Smoking

        Health | Smoking Cessation

Find Your Reason to Quit Smoking (<i>cont'd</i>)

"...It turned out that I learned something about me and my smoking habit every time I tried to quit."

I tried to quit so many times and thought I was never going to be able to do it. But it turned out that I learned something about me and my smoking habit every time I tried to quit. I had to concentrate on not giving up something I enjoyed. I had to concentrate on the benefits of being a non-smoker. I talked to other people who had quit and tried to come up with benefits of not smoking. I listed benefits of smoking and not smoking. You can guess how that list turned out — very few benefits of smoking...

I really wanted to be a non-smoker. Looking back I know that the key for me was to keep trying — over and over and over again. I would get discouraged and tell myself that I was never going to try again. I can't put my finger on any one thing when I did make it, except that every time previously I had learned something. — Iris H.

"I quit because I didn't like the fact that cigarettes had control over me."

"I quit because I didn't like the fact that cigarettes had control over me. They dictated when I got up, when I took a break, when I ate, where I could go, everything. I do think the mind-set came on gradually though. I started to not like the way my car smelled, or my house, or myself. If I had an interview or appointment, I would wait until after the appointment to have a cigarette. One day I quit 'cold turkey.' I just crushed out my cigarette, and said to myself 'no more!'

I did carry a pack around with me for the first two weeks. I was, after all, a two pack a day smoker. I needed my "security blanket". I would take walks on my breaks instead of having a smoke. I would drink coffee or water to use my hands and mouth. I started to walk every morning. I also let everyone know what I was doing. I had a lot of support. It has been seven years, and I have not had a cigarette since. I feel GREAT!" — Marianne L.

"'Kissing a smoker is like licking a dirty ashtray,' he said."

"'Me quit smoking?' I asked the doctor. 'Why should I?' I asked. This was when I was getting ready to go home from the hospital after my third lung collapse. After giving me all the reasons why I should quit including showing me a gallon jug of the smelly brown goop he'd pumped out of my lungs, I still wasn't convinced. Just then my new hubby George walked in and said, "But Honey, you're so much nicer to kiss!" "Kissing a smoker is like licking a dirty ash tray!," he said. 'Are you saying I taste like a dirty ash tray?' I asked. He squirmed a bit and said, 'Well, yes you do, Honey.' 'Okay,' I said, 'I quit!' And I did. That was after trying everything including hypnosis, auto-suggestion, cutting down, fining myself etc. And I was a five-pack-a-day smoker! That was 40 years ago and I haven't smoked since!" — Dorcas Z.

"...They were getting rich on something that was killing me."

"I am a stubborn person, and once when I bought a pack of cigs that were mashed and broken in the pack I returned it to the company. They sent me a letter that to me was sort of sarcastic. 'Yours in many years of smoking,' [it said,] and I realized that they had me over a barrel. I was hooked by a dirty habit. They were getting rich on something that was killing me. — Carol F.

"Even if it's your life, others will have to care for you round the clock, and worse yet, watch you suffer in the end."

"And the final thing that kept me off cigarettes forever? I took care of my ex-mother-in-law when she was dying from lung cancer. She had retired only 18 months before her diagnosis and never got to spend her comfortable retirement on fun things. Her diagnosis came from the discovery of tumors in her brain, metastasized from lung cancer. She was reduced to being paranoid, barely verbal, unable to walk... Even if it's your life, others will have to care for you round the clock, and worse yet, watch you suffer in the end."


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