Modern Medical Technology

Curious about lasers, nanobots and bionic eyes? Learn how modern medical technologies are extending and improving the lives of humans.

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Our heart is a complicated organ made up of many parts that sometimes don't always work as they should. Take a look at what can be used to keep a heart on a healthy beat.

By Maria Trimarchi

Peter Pan? Besides the fact that he can fly, he never grows up. But in real life, aging is inevitable, no matter how we rage against the dying of the light. Or is it?

By Molly Edmonds

A torn elbow ligament once signaled the end of a pitching career. But a groundbreaking surgery named after Hall of Fame pitcher Tommy John changed that bleak scenario, and the mound hasn't been the same since.

By Robert Lamb

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In the history of desperate time and desperate measures, you'll find Jeff Getty's story. After getting FDA approval and finding a willing doctor, Getty had a baboon bone marrow transplant in 1995. The results? A mixed bag of success and skepticism.

By Cristen Conger

The top 2008 medical mysteries HowStuffWorks tried to solve go from wisdom teeth to height. Check out the top 2008 medical mysteries and health questions.

Inkjet printers might be doing a lot more for doctors than just printing medical forms. This technology combined with microneedles could create a drug patch that might replace hypodermic needles.

By Isaac Perry Clements

Sticks and stones may break your bones, but tarantula venom may prevent you from having a heart attack. Could some of the world's most fearsome creatures be harboring cures for disease?

By Josh Clark

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Doctors and researchers continually develop new methods to fight against brain damage caused by strokes. But is it possible for lasers to bust up the clots? How can a laser get into your brain, anyway?

By Molly Edmonds

It's hard to imagine that the pills handed to you by the pharmacist in the pristine white lab coat were derived from the darkest, muggiest depths of the rainforest.

By Josh Clark

While your iPod may bring you hours of enjoyment it, could also cause health problems. Read our list of seven health problems for the modern age.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.

Hearing aids -- small electronic devices that amplify sound -- can help restore many of the sounds that hearing-impaired people are missing. Find out how hearing aids work in this article.

By Stephanie Watson

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In a July 2007 study, scientists detailed their use of gold nanoparticles to detect breast cancer. Nanoparticles may also form the basis of future cancer treatments.

By Jacob Silverman

An ingenious new method of creating artificial bone makes use of something many people have in their home: an inkjet printer. Find out how an inkjet printer can turn out artificial bones.

By Jacob Silverman

Radiation therapy for cancer is based on the idea of selective cell destruction, and it destroys cells using energy. As it turns out, protons release energy in a different way than X-rays do.

By Julia Layton

A company called Second Sight has received FDA approval to begin U.S. trials of a retinal implant system that gives blind people a limited degree of vision. Find out how the "bionic eye" will work.

By Julia Layton

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Studies show anywhere from a 25 percent to a 50 percent decrease in mortality and hospitalization rates for heart patients who get the flu vaccine. Find out how researchers are connecting the flu vaccine with increased heart health.

By Julia Layton

Scientists have developed a new ultrasound transducer to stimulate the growth of teeth and fix asymmetric jaw bones. See how it works.

By Cameron Lawrence

Robots are already assisting doctors in the operating room. Tele-surgery may not be that far off. Learn about robotic surgery and what it could mean to the future of health care.

By Kevin Bonsor & Jonathan Strickland