5 Reasons to Go on Senior Singles Cruises


1
Lose the Singles Supplement

Typically, cruises book their rooms with a per-person, double occupancy rate. In other words, it's a room for two. So when a single person goes on a cruise, they'll have to pay a singles supplement -- a fee which runs anywhere from 110 percent to 200 percent of the per person rate. There are single share programs, where cruises offer to match you up with a roommate of the same sex and smoking preference. But who wants to share a room with a stranger on vacation? Some senior cruises waive the singles supplement, so pull out your AARP card and hit the open sea!

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Sources

  • Brandon, Emily. "Raising the Retirement Age." Usnews.com, August 5, 2008. http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/planning-to-retire/2008/08/05/raising-the-retirement-age
  • "Retirement benefits by year of birth." Ssa.gov, 2010. http://www.ssa.gov/retire2/agereduction.htm
  • "Seniors Single Cruises." Cruisesandseniors.com, 2010. http://cruisesandseniors.com/senior_singles_cruises.html
  • "Tours and Cruises for Single Seniors." Seniorcitizensnet.com, 2010. http://seniorcitizensnet.com/travels/permalink.php?article=Tours+and+Cruises+for+Single+Seniors.txt

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