Your Cuticles Are What You Eat

Boost the health of your cuticles by cleaning up your diet. Avoid alcohol, sugar and fats, and be sure to get important nutrients for nail health, including vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin C, vitamin D, vitamin E, calcium, zinc and lean protein [source: Bruno].

Home Remedies for Dry Cuticles

Now that the excess skin is gone and your cuticles look healthy and beautiful, it's time to maintain that neat and refined look. Like any beauty routine, cuticle care will take some time and commitment at first, but soon, keeping your cuticles moisturized will become part of your regimen. The best part about your new routine is that you can maintain it at home.

Start with exfoliation: Do it regularly to prevent overgrowth of the cuticles. You can find exfoliators at the drug or beauty supply store -- you can have some fun and whip up a much less expensive batch at home. To use an exfoliating scrub, start with dry hands. Mix oil and sugar into a small bowl of water to create an easy scrub. Massage the scrub into the cuticles in a circular motion for about 30 seconds per finger. Rinse, dry and slather on your cuticle moisturizer.

If there isn't enough time for daily moisturizing and regular exfoliation, or if you feel like you need deep moisturizing, simply do it while you're sleeping [source: Monroe]. Slather the hands in a thick, heavy cream, making sure to massage an extra amount on the cuticles. Cover the hands with 100 percent cotton gloves [source: Mayo Clinic]. The gloves will not only protect the sheets, but will keep your hands from drying out overnight. Wake to beautifully soft hands in the morning and enjoy them all day.

Solutions for dry and cracked cuticles are right at your fingertips! To learn more about keeping your cuticles soft and supple, visit the links on the next page.