©2007 Publications International Horseradish has been used in herbal  remedies for centuries, specifically  in relieving sinus problems.

Have you ever bitten into a roast beef sandwich and thought your nose was on fire? The sandwich probably contained some horseradish, a cousin of mustard. Even a tiny taste of this potent condiment seems to go straight to your nose.

Uses of Horseradish

Whether it's on a roast beef sandwich or in an herbal preparation, horseradish clears sinuses, increases facial circulation, and promotes expulsion of mucus from upper respiratory passages. It has been used as a medicine for centuries.

Horseradish is helpful for sinus infections because it encourages your body to get rid of mucus. One way a sinus infection starts is with the accumulation of thick mucus in the sinuses, which lays out the welcome mat for bacteria: Stagnant mucus is the perfect breeding ground for bacteria to multiply and cause a painful infection. Horseradish can help thin and move out older, thicker mucous accumulations; thin, watery mucus is easier to eliminate. If you are prone to developing sinus infections, try taking horseradish the minute you feel a cold coming on to prevent mucus from accumulating in your sinus cavities. Herbalists also recommend horseradish for common colds, influenza, and lung congestion. Incidentally, don't view the increase of mucus production after horseradish therapy as a sign your cold is worsening. The free-flowing mucus is a positive sign that your body is ridding itself of wastes, so bear with it for a day or two.

Horseradish has a mild natural antibiotic effect, and it stimulates urine production. Thus, it has been used to treat urinary infections. If you experience chronic urinary, sinus, or other infections, you should know horseradish is considered safe for long-term use. Occasionally, horseradish is used topically to alleviate the pain of arthritis and nerve irritation. Horseradish also has been used as a poultice to treat infected wounds. Horseradish, however, may redden the skin and cause an irritation or rash. Keep reading to learn about other warnings and preparation tips for horseradish, including a recipe for horseradish-cranberry holiday relish.

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors of Consumer Guide (R), Publications International, Ltd., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies.   Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness. Each state and each discipline has its own rules about whether practitioners are required to be professionally licensed. If you plan to visit a practitioner, it is recommended that you choose one who is licensed by a recognized national organization and who abides by the organization's standards. It is always best to speak with your primary health care provider before starting any new therapeutic technique.