A Porcelain Beauty

If you're fair skinned, or just want to protect your skin from harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays, you may want to look into a skin cream that contains CoQ10. When CoQ10 is applied topically, or through the skin, it can get into the skin cells known as keratinocytes and possibly protect them from oxidative DNA damage, which can be caused by the sun's rays [source: Stocker].

CoQ10 and Skin Health

­Are you in your 20s? If so, keep reading, but you'll need to remember this information for later, much later -- as you currently have the most CoQ10 in your body than you ever will. And it will only decrease with age. So if you're in your 30s, it's worth a pause, and if you've reached 40 and are interested in keeping your skin youthful and healthy looking, you definitely want to stop and learn about CoQ10 and skin health.

Some studies and trials have reported that CoQ10 can counteract free radicals and the damage they cause [source: Katsman]. Free radicals are molecules that have unpaired electrons, making them highly reactive. They can damage cells, particularly in this case your skin cells, causing wrinkles and making your skin appear older. The antioxidants within CoQ10 can withstand and reverse skin damage, preserving the collagen and elastin within your skin cells to make you appear younger.

More and more products on the market, particularly skin-care creams, are adding CoQ10 as an ingredient because of these properties. The idea that CoQ10 can reverse damage is probably the most alluring. However, if you're 50 and you're wondering if you will suddenly look 30 again, the answer is, "Not likely." No cream is known to produce results that dramatic, and like most of CoQ10's purported benefits and utilizations, there still need to be more studies conducted before the results are conclusive.

If you're intrigued by the potential of CoQ10 and decide to add it to your daily regimen, remember it's a good idea to consult your doctor first.

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