Aromatherapy for Herpes

Herpes Relief

  • 10 drops tea tree oil
  • 5 drops myrrh oil
  • 5 drops geranium or bergamot oil
  • 2 drops peppermint oil (optional)
  • 1/2 ounce vegetable oil

Combine the ingredients and shake or stir well. Apply directly to affected area three to five times a day during an outbreak. The peppermint oil is optional because some people find it increases, rather than dulls, the pain. If you would prefer a less oily formula, you can substitute either rubbing alcohol or vodka for the vegetable oil, but try a little first to make sure the alcohol doesn't sting too much.

Herpes is a painful viral infection that appears on the genitals or around the mouth in the form of fever blisters. The herpes virus can lay dormant in the nervous system, appearing only now and then. Current conventional medicine has little to offer to treat herpes and does not know how to eliminate the virus. The virus reactivates when the immune system is weakened, such as when you are under emotional or physical stress. In addition to treating herpes, consider using aromatherapy and other methods to build up your immune system and to relax.

Research shows that creams made from capsaicin, a compound found in cayenne, deadens the pain of herpes and also shingles, which is caused by a related virus. Capsaicin creams are sold in drugstores and many natural food stores. The essential oils of cayenne will work if added to a cream or oil base, but go easy with it because too much can burn the skin. Small amounts of peppermint sometimes also diminish the nerve-tingling pain of herpes and shingles.

Tea tree, especially the type known as niaouli, is the favorite essential oil to treat herpes. Although much more expensive, an essential oil of myrrh is also very effective. Dilute the essential oil of your choice in an equal amount of vegetable oil or alcohol, and apply it directly to the herpes blisters. If applied as soon as the blisters begin to appear, any of these oils may prevent the virus from breaking out. This formula can be used on another virus related to herpes, called herpes zoster, which causes chicken pox and shingles.

Essential oils for herpes and shingles: bergamot, eucalyptus, geranium, myrrh, peppermint (relieves itching), tea tree (especially niaouli)

To learn more about Aromatherapy and other alternative medicines, see:
  • Aromatherapy: Here you will learn about aromatherapy, how it works, what part essential oils play, and how to use aromatherapy.
  • Essential Oils Profiles: We have collected profiles of dozens of plants that are used to produce essential oils. On these pages, you will learn the properties and preparations for the most popular essential oils.
  • How to Treat Common Conditions With Aromatherapy: Aromatherapy can be used to treat a number of conditions, from asthma to depression to skin problems. Here you will learn how to treat some common medical problems with aromatherapy.
  • Home Remedies: We have gathered over a hundred safe, time-tested home remedies for treating a wide variety of medical complaints yourself.
  • Herbal Remedies: Herbal remedies and aromatherapy can be very similar, and they stem from similar historic roots. On this page, you will find all of our herb profiles and instructions for treating medical problems with herbal remedies.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Kathi Keville is director of the American Herb Association and editor of the American Herb Association Quarterly newsletter. A writer, photographer, consultant, and teacher specializing in aromatherapy and herbs for over 25 years, she has written several books, including Aromatherapy: The Complete Guide to the Healing Art and Pocket Guide to Aromatherapy, and has written over 150 articles for such magazines as New Age Journal, The Herb Companion, and New Herbal Remedies.

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors of Consumer Guide (R), Publications International, Ltd., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider.