Warning Signs

Lactic acid can be a great tool if you are unhappy with your skin's texture. However, if your skin texture is displaying unusual qualities -- like thickness or swelling -- that lactic acid doesn't fix, see a doctor. Skin texture changes can be attributed to a variety of illnesses, from thyroid issues to diabetes to a vitamin A deficiency [source: Cure Research]. Be sure an underlying illness isn't affecting your skin's texture before you continue treating it with lactic acid.

Lactic Acid and Skin Texture

Practically everyone would love to have perfect skin that's free of blotches and blemishes. Unfortunately, that ideal is not so easy to achieve. If you're looking to improve your skin's overall texture, though, you might have found a friend in lactic acid.

As an alpha hydroxy acid (AHA), lactic acid is a member of a well-known family of exfoliants. As such, it improves skin's overall texture by moisturizing, sloughing off dead surface cells and promoting collagen growth. Consequently, lactic acid often works well as a wrinkle and line reducer and helps to even out skin tone and diminish acne scars [source: Skincare News].

Lactic acid is considered one of the best AHAs to use, because most AHAs can often be irritating to the skin. Lactic acid is uniquely gentle by comparison and typically doesn't irritate people who have skin conditions like acne or rosacea. However, if your skin is extremely sensitive, you should still be cautious when using these products, especially if the lactic acid content is particularly high [source: Skincare News].

To learn more about one of lactic acid's most popular treatments, read on.