10 Best Things About Quitting Smoking


1
Improved Overall Health
After 15 years, an ex-smoker has no increased risk of heart attack from smoking.
After 15 years, an ex-smoker has no increased risk of heart attack from smoking.
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Cancer isn't the only health risk caused by long-term smoking. Smoking increases your risk of heart attack, stroke, and chronic respiratory conditions like asthma, bronchitis and emphysema. When a person smokes, oxygen in the blood is replaced by carbon monoxide, the blood vessels narrow, and nicotine increases the heart and blood pressure. To make sure enough oxygen is distributed throughout the body, the heart has to pump harder in order to compensate. Eventually, this causes strain on the heart, which causes the heart disease associated with smoking. Respiratory diseases result from inhaled carbon monoxide and tar from cigarettes.

Luckily for smokers who decide to quit, the health of the body improves very quickly after a person stops smoking. The blood pressure and pulse can be back to normal about an hour after a cigarette, and carbon monoxide will be out of the body in a few days. After a month, coughing and shortness of breath will improve. After only a year, an ex-smoker's risk of heart disease goes down by 50 percent. After 15 years, a former smoker has no increased risk of heart attack from smoking [source: University of South Florida].

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Sources

  • American Academy of Dermatology. "Causes of Aging Skin." (Nov. 22, 2010)
  • American Academy of Family Physicians. "Smoking: Steps to Help You Break the Habit" December 2009. (Nov. 19, 2010)http://familydoctor.org/online/famdocen/home/common/addictions/tobacco/161.html
  • American Cancer Society. "Guide to Quitting Smoking." (Nov. 22, 2010)http://www.cancer.org/Healthy/StayAwayfromTobacco/GuidetoQuittingSmoking/index
  • Associated Press. "Smokers Paying Extra for Health Insurance." MSNBC.com. Feb. 16, 2006. (Nov. 22, 2010)http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11394043/ns/health-addictions
  • Gilman, Stephen E. "Parental Smoking and Adolescent Smoking Initiation: An Intergenerational Perspective on Tobacco Control." Pediatrics. Vol. 123, no. 2. Page 274-281. February 2009.http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/123/2/e274?maxtoshow=&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=stephen+gilman&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT
  • Hendrick, Bill. "Cigarette Smoking Dulls Taste." WebMD.com. Aug. 21, 2009. (Nov. 22, 2010)http://www.webmd.com/smoking-cessation/news/20090821/cigarette-smoke-dulls-taste-buds
  • Hurt, Richard D. "Smoking: Does it Cause Wrinkles?" Mayoclinic.com. Oct. 24, 2009. (Nov. 17, 2010)http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/smoking/AN00644
  • Millman, China. "A Taste for Cigarettes." Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. Feb. 7, 2010. (Nov. 22, 2010)http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10038/1033928-51.stm
  • National Cancer Institute. "Putting a Stop to Smoky Thinking." (Nov. 15, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/topic-benefits-smoky.aspx
  • National Cancer Institute. "Benefits of Quitting." (Nov. 18, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/topic-benefits.aspx
  • National Cancer Institute. "Harms of Smoking and Health Benefits of Quitting." Oct. 28, 2010. (Nov. 18, 2010)http://www.cancer.gov/cancertopics/factsheet/Tobacco/cessation
  • National Cancer Institute. "Quit Guide" (Nov. 15, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/qg-index.aspx
  • Smith, Hilary. "The High Cost of Smoking." MSN Money. (Nov. 22, 2010)http://articles.moneycentral.msn.com/Insurance/InsureYourHealth/HighCostOfSmoking.aspx
  • University of South Florida, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. "Forever Free Booklet 1: An Overview." 2000. (Nov. 16, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/pubs/FF1.pdf
  • University of South Florida, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. "Forever Free Booklet 3: Smoking and Weight." 2000. (Nov. 16, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/pubs/FF3.pdf
  • University of South Florida, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. "Forever Free Booklet 5: Your Health." 2000. (Nov. 16, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/pubs/FF5.pdf
  • University of South Florida, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. "Forever Free Booklet 8: Life Without Cigarettes." 2000. (Nov. 16, 2010)http://www.smokefree.gov/pubs/FF8.pdf
  • Volkow, Nora D. "Science of Addiction: Nicotine." American Medical Association Web site. (Nov. 19, 2010)http://www.ama-assn.org/ama1/pub/upload/mm/433/ama_nida_nicotine.pdf

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