The Wrinkle Reducing Popularity Contest

According to the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Botox was the most popular cosmetic procedure in 2002 [source: ASAPS: 6.9 Million]. In that year, a total of 1,658,667 men and women received Botox injections [source: ASAPS:stats].

Botox for Crow's Feet

For some, creams aren't enough. But there's another, nonsurgical option: Botox. Crow's feet are most pronounced when you work the muscles around your eyes, so their appearance is unavoidable when you smile, laugh or squint. Botox -- short for botulinum toxin injections -- literally relaxes those muscles so they can't contract. It works by blocking the chemical signal that travels from your nerves to your muscles, telling them to function. Though Botox treatments are FDA approved and generally safe, they can result in complications if the toxin spreads beyond the treatment area, so you should only receive injections from a certified physician [source: MayoClinic: Botox, WebMD: Botox].

The upside of Botox is that it only takes a few minutes. The downsides are that it involves needles, it isn't cheap, and it doesn't last. To break it down, the procedure involves injecting the toxin into specific muscles around the eyes, or any other area you might want treated. There is no anesthesia so you're likely to experience some discomfort. Currently, the average cost per treatment is roughly $400 [source: Louis]. After an injection, it may take up to a week to see any results, and those can last anywhere from three to six months [source: AAD:Botulinum, MayoClinic: Botox].

There are a few side effects that come with the procedure, including temporary bruising and headaches. While the bruising is rather common, the headaches are rare and should go away over the course of a couple of days. It's also important not to rub the treated area after an injection. Doing so may encourage the toxin to seep into your eyelid muscles, causing them to droop. Unfortunately, there is a possibility of this happening even if you don't rub the treated area, but the droopiness fades over time [source: MayoClinic: Botox, AAD:Botulinum].

The bottom line is that while Botox can't completely get rid of your crow's feet, it will reduce their appearance significantly. If you can handle the needles and you've got the cash, you can hide those wrinkles with almost no effort on your part.

If Botox is a little extreme for your tastes, read on to find out about some cheaper, natural remedies.