General Cancer Facts

General cancer facts include the basics of how cancers form and spread and how they are treated. Learn about the symptoms and causes of cancer and find out the truth about cancer myths with these general cancer facts.

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Friends often tell cancer patients to "stay positive" in order to beat the disease. But is there any scientific proof that positivity helps with cancer survival? And can positivity have a dark side?

By Alia Hoyt

If a friend or relative is undergoing chemotherapy, you want to help them but may not be sure of the best way to do so. Here are eight great ideas that almost any patient will appreciate.

By Alia Hoyt

You've probably heard of a tumor, but what about a neoplasm? How similar are they and are they always cancerous?

By Jesslyn Shields

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Just 10 percent of Americans with pancreatic cancer survive for at least five years. Why is the outlook so grim and what can be done about it?

By Alia Hoyt

The EPA deemed ethylene oxide a carcinogen in 2016, yet there are many cities across the country being polluted with the invisible gas.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Good news, for a change: The cancer death rate in America has declined 26 percent since 1991. Here's why.

By Alia Hoyt

A new smartphone app may help detect pancreatic cancer and other diseases tied to jaundice.

By Sarah Gleim

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A new study shows that by testing for multiple genetic factors, it's possible to identify those who have a higher-than-normal risk of developing testicular cancer, a disease that often strikes young men.

By Patrick J. Kiger

We often feel unsure about what to say to a friend with a serious illness, so we fall back on clichés. Here are some better ways to help from people who've been through it.

By Alia Hoyt

Researchers and doctors know some cancers in teens have skyrocketed since 1975. They just don't know why.

By Nichole Bazemore

This is what happens when fearless knitters take on breast cancer one stitch at a time.

By Kate Kershner

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Modern cancer treatments can be almost as bad as the disease, but new immunotherapy research suggests we could optimize our own immune systems using donor T cells.

By Jesslyn Shields

Scientists know that being married makes you more likely to survive cancer. Now they've discovered why.

By Alia Hoyt

Depending on the test and other factors, false positives can be extremely high for certain tests. Why is that, and what can be done about it?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

The parasite-host relationship just got a lot more complicated.

By Robert Lamb

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We're surrounded by WiFi these days. What types of radio waves are being emitted, and should we be concerned?

By Jennifer Sellers

An estimated 1.6 million people will be diagnosed with cancer in 2015 — just in the United States. How long until chemo isn't a fact of life for people we know?

By Kate Kershner

Cutting out sugar from your diet may have many health benefits. But can removing the sweet stuff help get rid of cancer, too? We separate fact from fiction.

By Laurie L. Dove

I’ve explored the pros and cons of coffee in depth. It’s a sticky issue because a study comes out one week that points to coffee as a wonder drug and in the next week, we’re reminded of its dangers.

By Sara Novak

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There are a number of known triggers for hiccups. Learn whether hiccups can be a side effect of chemo in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Hiccups are the result of a spasm in your diaphragm. Learn whether pancreatic cancer can cause constant hiccups in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

By the end of 2010, an estimated 569,490 Americans will have died from cancer. That's more than 1,500 people every day, or one out of every four deaths in this country. So what is giving cancer such a push?

By Elizabeth Sprouse

In 2004 alone, cancer killed 7.4 million people worldwide. But thanks to advancements in cancer treatments, we're actually moving in the right direction in the war on cancer.

By Elizabeth Sprouse

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It would be great if fighting cancer was like playing a game of "Pac-Man." Pac-Man runs through mazes and chomps down every single pac-dot, but we lack the ability to track down and kill cancer cells as easily. What weapons do we have?

By Molly Edmonds

Normal cells act as the body's team players, while cancerous cells go rogue. How does a cell morph from normal to abnormal, and why does it happen?

By Molly Edmonds