Health Myths

Health myths are often nothing more than old wives' tales that have been repeated and practiced for so long that is hard to distinguish between fact and fiction. For example, is it really bad for our eyes to sit too close to the TV?

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Just about every nation and culture has its own special alcoholic beverage — and its own hangover cure. Some may actually work while others may just make you sicker. Which one of these will you try?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

That's not really the scoop. A new study doesn’t exactly claim that one minute of intense exercise is the same as 45 minutes of moderate exercise. But it's not far off.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

Are you a human barometer? Do changes in the weather cause you physical pain? Read this and find out if you can really feel the weather right down to your bones.

By Jennifer Sellers

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There are many commonly held beliefs about fat that aren't entirely accurate. For example, muscle simply can't turn into fat.

By Maria Trimarchi

Ugh, the morning after the night before! Should you drink some coffee, lots of water or more liquor? Or have some bacon and eggs? There are lots of "remedies" out there for hangovers, most of which are useless.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

You probably have a list of go-to remedies for colds. But is all that echinacea and chicken soup really helping?

By Maria Trimarchi

When you've spent the day enjoying hot dogs off the grill, is it safe to jump right into the pool and show off your butterfly stroke? Or do you need to take a breather -- a 60-minute break, to be exact?

By Michael Franco

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In the "get well soon" world, flowers are the go-to gift. So why do some hospitals ban them from the premises? Are the uplifting blooms really bad for you?

By Julia Layton

If someone told you sugar makes kids hyper and cats are after your baby's air supply, you've heard some old wives' tales. Is there any truth in them?

By Shanna Freeman & Christine Venzon

Sucking on a thumb is a normal reflex that soothes children in times of stress; it's essentially a security blanket that's attached to the body. But will this innocent gesture wreck their teeth?

By Molly Edmonds

This expression is repeated about as often apples are eaten. But does it have any truth to it? Should the apple really take credit for keeping people in impeccable health?

By Amy Hunter

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Another headache? Time to reach for your snake oil -- or maybe your electromagnetic belt. Quacks have pulled the wool over people's eyes for years in the name of medicine. Here are 10 of their more outrageous cons.

By Tom Scheve

We've all heard questionable medical assertions, such getting arthritis from cracking your knuckles. Read our list of 9 medical myths.

By the Editors of Publications International, Ltd.