Skin Cleansing

Skin cleaning promotes good hygiene as well as more youthful looking skin. Learn more about skin cleaning at HowStuffWorks.

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The term "noncomedogenic" is usually one of many words you might see listed on the packaging of skin care products these days. But what's so special about it that it can keep your skin from breaking out?

By Sarah Siddons

No-rinse facial cleansers might save you a little time in your daily skin care routine if you're on the go. But are they any different from regular facial cleansers?

By Amy Bassett

Getting rid of extra dead skin cells can prevent blemishes on your body and give your skin a soft glow, but exfoliating too often can do damage. How much exfoliating is too much?

By Alexander Page

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Exfoliating your face can help your skin stay soft and blemish-free, but how often you scrub away dead skin cells should depend on your skin type. What's the right amount for you?

By Elizabeth Whitmore

You may use your bath sponge for weeks or months, but during that time it becomes a comfy home for bacteria and mold. How can you tell when it's time to throw the old sponge out?

By Sarah Siddons

Using a small towel to scrub your face might seem like a harmless practice, but you could be introducing bacteria onto your skin. Find out how to tell if your washcloth is unsafe.

By Sarah Siddons

With the green movement coming into full swing over the past few years, there's been a big increase in skin care products being marketed as "organic." What exactly is in these products, and are they any better for you than traditional ones?

By Sarah Siddons

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With so many different skin types -- from sensitive to dry -- and so many different skin problems -- from wrinkles to acne -- it can be difficult to find the skin-cleansing formula that's right for you. Where's the best place to start?

By John Barrymore

If soap leaves your skin dry and irritated, you may need a soapless skin cleanser. Soapless cleansers are gentler on skin and just as effective at removing dirt and oil -- but how do they work?

By Christina Pander

If you have blemishes on your chest, back or arms, you have body acne. Body acne can be an embarrassing and uncomfortable problem, but there are ways to treat it.

By John Barrymore

You may have heard that eating chocolate can cause acne, but can satisfying your sweet tooth actually cause pimples?

By Elizabeth Whitmore

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If you drift off to dreamland without removing your foundation and mascara, it's time for a change of habit. Sleeping with makeup on can be damaging to your skin.

By Elizabeth Whitmore

You may have heard that certain foods -- such as chocolate or shellfish -- cause acne. But while these are myths, you may be surprised to learn that milk and dairy products can cause breakouts.

By Alexander Page

When it comes to your car or your kitchen floor, squeaky clean is exactly what you're looking for. But when you're washing your face, you don't necessarily want that same shiny finish.

By Sarah Jourdain

Dermatologists say that popping pimples is a big no-no. But let's face it -- sometimes you just can't help yourself. Can you pop a pimple properly?

By Matteson Cade

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We've all dealt with a pimple now and then, but for some of us it's a daily irritation. If you're prone to acne, you have to take a little extra care with your face -- and it all starts with a good, gentle wash.

By Michael Franco

Establishing a skin care regimen for dry skin can save you from a lot of itchy, red distress. Ironically, exposing dry skin to water actually saps moisture, so you'll want to be especially vigilant about caring for your dermis.

By Victoria Vogt

Oily skin can strike anyone, regardless of age, ethnicity, gender or geographic location. Think all hope is lost? We've put together a list of tips for cleansing oily skin, debunking some well-known skin care myths along the way.

By Alia Hoyt

You use soap to get your skin fresh and clean. So what happens when your body bar leaves behind redness, scaling and blisters instead of dewy skin? Some allergens in soap can wreak all kinds of havoc.

By Gallagher Flinn

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Your skin cycle is just about perfect in infancy: The outer layer gets sloughed off every few days. But since no one's a baby for long, what are five ways to speed up natural exfoliation on your own?

By Julia Layton

If you've found your skin reacting badly to certain products, you might want to check the label for gluten. Those with very sensitive skin might benefit from using gluten-free cleansers that are gentle on delicate facial tissue.

By Chris Obenschain

Less than 200 years ago, soap was considered a luxury item, and people's bathing habits were infrequent, at best. We've come a long way since then. These are the five cleansers you'll most commonly see in showers.

By Chris Obenschain

For skin exfoliation, a lot of people prefer to go natural -- using ingredients that can be found at the local health food store or even at the supermarket. But what ingredients make a good exfoliant?

By Maria Trimarchi & Patrick J. Kiger

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Bubbles may make baths more fun for children, and a sudsy soak may be just what you need after a stressful day. But bubble baths have some surprising health risks that could have you rethinking bath time.

By Sarah Siddons

Natural sea sponges have become popular as the green trend pushes forward. What exactly is a sea sponge, and how is it any different from a regular sponge?

By Sarah Siddons