Alternative Medicine Image Gallery
Alternative Medicine Image Gallery

©2007 Publications International, Ltd. There is a large palate of herbs and herbal remedies that you can use to treat everyday medical conditions. See more pictures of alternative medicines.

While some people may dismiss herbal remedies as quackery, the use of botanicals is well rooted in medical practice. Ancient doctors methodically collected information about herbs and developed well-defined pharmacopoeias to treat a variety of ailments. More than a quarter of all drugs used today contain active ingredients derived from those same ancient plants.

It's estimated that nearly 80 percent of the world's population use herbs for some aspect of primary health care. In the United States, more than 1,500 botanicals are sold as dietary supplements; top-selling herbs include echinacea, garlic, goldenseal, ginseng, ginkgo, saw palmetto, aloe, ephedra, Siberian ginseng, and cranberry.

Clinical studies on a handful of herbs are underway, but to help you understand the benefits and risks, we've compiled a comprehensive guide to herbs, including potential uses, side effects, and precautions. In no time you will learn how to use herbs to treat some common health conditions like allergies, indigestion, and even anxiety. We've also selected some common medical problems and shown you how to treat these conditions through herbal medicine. Finally, if you wanted to browse condition specific to your gender, check out Herbal Remedies for Women or Herbal Remedies for Men.

Otherwise, on the next page, you can enter the healing garden by exploring the herbs used in herbal remedies from the letter A through the letter C.

This information is solely for informational purposes. IT IS NOT INTENDED TO PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. Neither the Editors of Consumer Guide (R), Publications International, Ltd., the author nor publisher take responsibility for any possible consequences from any treatment, procedure, exercise, dietary modification, action or application of medication which results from reading or following the information contained in this information. The publication of this information does not constitute the practice of medicine, and this information does not replace the advice of your physician or other health care provider. Before undertaking any course of treatment, the reader must seek the advice of their physician or other health care provider. Before engaging in any complementary medical technique, including the use of natural or herbal remedies, you should be aware that many of these techniques have not been evaluated in scientific studies. Use of these remedies in connection with over the counter or prescription medications can cause severe adverse reactions. Often, only limited information is available about their safety and effectiveness. Each state and each discipline has its own rules about whether practitioners are required to be professionally licensed. If you plan to visit a practitioner, it is recommended that you choose one who is licensed by a recognized national organization and who abides by the organization's standards. It is always best to speak with your primary health care provider before starting any new therapeutic technique.