Indoor Allergies

Dust mites, mold and other allergens can live in your home or workplace. Get tips and information on how to reduce indoor allergies and improve indoor air quality.

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Dust mites are eight-legged creatures that don't bite or cause illness. But because they're so tiny and live in dust particles, they can be tricky to avoid no matter how often you clean your home.

By Maria Trimarchi

House dust is the most common cause of asthma and other allergic reactions. Learn more about why house dust is bad for allergies from this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Alternaria is a type of mold that commonly causes allergic reactions. Learn about signs of alternaria mold allergies in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

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People can be allergic to pollen, mold or other substances. Learn which house plants can cause allergies in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Dust allergies can be caused by dust mites, animal dander or fungus. Learn about dust allergy symptoms in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Mold allergies can result in hair loss. Find out how exposure to mold can lead to hair loss from this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Some people believe in the healing power of alkaline water. Find out about using alkaline water to treat mold allergies from this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

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Mold allergies typically develop in kids by the time they're 10 years old. Learn about signs of mold allergies in children in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Mold allergies are caused by spores that you breathe in. Learn about symptoms of mold allergies in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Mold allergies can bother you just in the summer, or year-round. Learn about the different types of mold allergies in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

An air purifier may help relieve allergy symptoms if used properly. Find out how air purifiers may help with allergies from this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

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Mold allergies can lead to lung conditions such as bronchitis. Find out how mold can cause bronchitis from this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

Mold allergies can cause a host of hay fever-like symptoms. Learn whether there is a treatment for mold allergies in this article.

By HowStuffWorks.com Contributors

If you have allergies, you probably know that dreaded dust mites live in your mattresses, carpets and rugs. But what kind of vacuum works best to remove these eight-legged intruders?

By Tom Scheve

If you have pets, you're likely to have fur issues. A pet-hair-filled house can be a challenge for any vacuum cleaner -- and not all floor cleaners are created equally. Making the right purchase requires careful consideration of several factors.

By Jennifer Sellers

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If you're one of 50 million Americans suffering from allergies, your bedroom may contribute to frequent sniffling and sneezing. Specifically, mattress allergens may be to blame. So what can you do to prevent reactions and get on with your day?

By Maria Trimarchi

Mold has been attributed to causing allergies to form in the human body. Follow these tips for avoiding mold related allergies to live a healthier life.

By Bobbie Hasselbring

Avoiding allergens during the holidays is important to your health. Learn more about what you can do to avoid allergies during the holiday season.

By Bobbie Hasselbring

Eliminating dust mites completely is impossible, but you can greatly reduce their population in your home to cut down on the allergens they produce in their feces, which we can inhale into our lungs. Learn about controlling dust mites.

By the editors of PureHealthMD

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Dust mites are commonly linked to allergies because of their effect on a person's immune system. Lean more about how you can protect yourself against dust mites.

By Karen Serrano, MD

Limiting allergies when traveling will make for a healthier more enjoyable trip. Discover what you can do to reduce the potential of acquiring an allergy while exploring the open road.

By Karen Serrano, MD

Every room in your house is a potential host for the sources of allergies -- pet hair, dust and mold. But keeping an allergen-free house is not an impossibility. Learn more about allergy-proofing your home.

By Linnea Lundgren & Jeff Wald

In order to maintain an allergen-free home, it is important to monitor your home climate systems. This means making sure your air conditioner, dehumidifier and heaters are not generating allergens.

By Linnea Lundgren

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Your kids are right -- there is a monster lurking in the bedroom and basement. However, the monster isn't lurking in a closet, instead it's home allergens.

By DiscoveryHealth.com writers

How can I monitor my blood pressure from home? Take a look at how a person can safely and conveniently take their blood pressure from the comfort of their on home in this article.

By DiscoveryHealth.com writers