Beauty and Hygiene

Beauty treatments and hygiene can go a long way to warding off cosmetic procedures. Find out how to take care of your hair, teeth and skin.

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Cold showers can improve your skin, your circulation, your sperm count and maybe your hair. Learn more about taking a cold shower for your health.

By Josh Peterson, Planet Green

The guy in the 1940's toothpaste ad has a toothbrush that looks two inches long, and he is covering every bit of it. Learn more about how much toothpaste should you use.

By Lloyd Alter, Planet Green

Saliva plays an important role in your teeth's health. Think you know what its job is?

By Terri Briseno

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When bacteria coat your teeth and gums and lead to dental issues, getting rid of the foul odor that's often a side effect isn't always easy. Which dental problems tend to cause bad breath, and what can you do about them?

By Tom Scheve

If your child has hand, foot and mouth disease, someone is likely to ask, "Wait, don't you get that from pigs?" No, that's hoof and mouth. So what exactly is hand, foot and mouth disease?

By Katie Lambert

Mouth cancer can be a vicious, sometimes-fatal attack on the body. Knowing what to look for, what to avoid and when to seek medical help is crucial in stemming the disease.

By Brion O'Connor

Wisdom teeth, tonsils and gall bladders may be the misfit toys of the human body, but with an 85 percent removal rate, those wise chompers rarely get to stick around for long.

By Kevin P. Allen

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From infection to insufficient bone mass, there are a number of issues that can arise with dental implants. Are you prepared?

By Brion O'Connor

Some people enjoy a dry sense of humor, and there are those who like a dry glass of wine. But dry mouth is one thing you probably hope to avoid. So what is it exactly?

By Kevin P. Allen

Gum disease, gingivitis, tooth decay -- they're all related. We'll explain how to avoid them here.

By Terri Briseno

Gingivitis is an oral health problem that, if left untreated, can lead to painful gum disease. Fortunately, it's relatively easy to treat -- and is totally preventable.

By Bambi Turner

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Plaque is a nasty bugger that likes to hang out on our teeth. And without proper dental hygiene, it can cause serious damage to those pearly whites.

By Terri Briseno

Cavities are holes that form on the enamel of your teeth, which need to be filled before they cause more damage. But how do they get there?

By Emilie Sennebogen

An aching tooth is bad enough, but how about one that's infected and full of pus? Find out how teeth get infected in the first place -- and what you can do about it -- in this article.

By Gerlinda Grimes

Tooth decay can strike at any age, but are there certain teeth you should keep more of an eagle eye on than others? Sink your (we hope not decaying) chompers into this article to find out.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

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When the tides recede, they expose the shells on the beach sand before rolling back in and covering everything up again. When your gums recede, they reveal the roots of your teeth -- but then they just keep on shrinking back.

By Katie Lambert

We've all seen toothpaste and mouthwash commercials warning us of the dangers of gingivitis. But can we actually catch gum disease from other people?

By Maria Trimarchi

Bleeding anywhere on your body is never good, but if your gums start to gush, it could mean serious trouble. Of course, it may also mean that you need to pick up the toothbrush a little more often.

By Amy Feinstein

Nicknamed for soldiers at war, trench mouth, though increasingly rare, continues to affect people in underdeveloped countries.

By Chris Opfer

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Sore gums can be a pain in the you-know-what, especially if you have no clue what's causing it. We'll give you some clues to what's causing that throbbing here.

By Terri Briseno

Even though one in five people gets canker sores, no one knows why. Luckily, there are some simple strategies for taking care of them.

By Sarah Winkler

An impacted tooth may not cause any visible damage, but that doesn't mean it isn't ruining your mouth -- or your health.

By Sara Elliott

There are multiple reasons you may have a metallic taste in your mouth. It's a fairly common complaint, and it could be anything from a side effect of pregnancy to a symptom of eating poisoned fish.

By Natalie Kilgore

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Did your mom ever tell you that too much candy could cause your teeth to fall out? Would you be happy to know that's not entirely true? Let's explore this and other dental myths.

By Caitlin Uttley

Tooth loss lead to costly dental treatments and detract from your physical appearance. But can it mean you have a disease?

By Jennifer Sellers