Modern Medical Technology

Curious about lasers, nanobots and bionic eyes? Learn how modern medical technologies are extending and improving the lives of humans.


Researchers have discovered how to bypass a hurdle in the design, modeling and printing of 3-D hair- and fur-like structures.

Right now if you need a new organ, you have to wait around until one is available. A new development puts us closer to a future where living tissue can be made to order.

It's not easy to treat a person who's hemorrhaging. Especially if that person isn't near a hospital. A cool, new tool could change the outcome of that scenario.

Goodbye, scary needles! Microneedle patches could ease needle fears and help boost vaccination rates.

Salamanders regrow their tails. Starfish can grow new arms. When is it our turn? Let's take a look at what science has in the works.

Microorganisms aren't all bad. Can we fight fire with fire and pit good bacteria against the bad ones? Yes, but maybe not the way you think.

We transplant DNA already in the form of blood transfusions and bone marrow transplants. But just DNA? That's a different story.

Soon, we'll all be carrying around little vials of neurons like ibuprofen in our purses. Well. Not SOON soon. But we've definitely made progress in recent years.

We've been hearing about tiny medical robots for decades. Where is this tiny dream team? Researchers promise these little guys are on the way -- and they might be even cooler than we thought.

The Internet of Things is more than a buzzword. If it does what it promises, the health care landscape will look very different -- and so will our relationships with our physicians.

Robotic surgery doesn't mean Rosie from "The Jetsons" is going to get it. Instead, these high-tech bots let surgeons make the tiniest, most precise movements to limit tissue damage. But even now, researchers are dreaming up better robot inventions.

Millions of Americans have pacemakers. What happens when all those batteries need to be replaced? What if they didn't?

We've all heard of blood donation, but did you know you can donate blood plasma? Find out how the process works, and how plasma is isolated from the rest of your blood.

Future Victor Frankensteins won't have to become grave robbers to obtain body parts. Instead, we're betting they'll take advantage of a rapidly developing technology known as bioprinting. What do you know about this crazy offshoot of 3-D printing?

You don't need that syringe. With wireless drug delivery, the pharmacy is located inside your body. Who's slated to benefit from it first?

At one time, a cancer diagnosis was a death sentence. But there are numerous treatment options for most types of cancer. See how epigenetics is providing another option in preventing cancer.

Now, doctors can replace every part of the human body, from skin and bones to organs, hands and faces. It's no longer science fiction to imagine that we could slowly replace our organs as they wear out. But surely there are limits?

Completely eradicating a disease is difficult. It's so complicated, in fact, that it's only been accomplished once, with smallpox. So what exactly does it take to eradicate a disease?

In the future, nanotechnology may allow us to inject nanobots -- or tiny robots -- into our bloodstream to deliver medicines and battle all types of diseases. And one of the most promising medical purposes for nanobots appears to be their potential to treat cancer.

Our heart is a complicated organ made up of many parts that sometimes don't always work as they should. Take a look at what can be used to keep a heart on a healthy beat.

Peter Pan? Besides the fact that he can fly, he never grows up. But in real life, aging is inevitable, no matter how we rage against the dying of the light. Or is it?

A torn elbow ligament once signaled the end of a pitching career. But a groundbreaking surgery named after Hall of Fame pitcher Tommy John changed that bleak scenario, and the mound hasn't been the same since.

In the history of desperate time and desperate measures, you'll find Jeff Getty's story. After getting FDA approval and finding a willing doctor, Getty had a baboon bone marrow transplant in 1995. The results? A mixed bag of success and skepticism.

The top 2008 medical mysteries HowStuffWorks tried to solve go from wisdom teeth to height. Check out the top 2008 medical mysteries and health questions.

Inkjet printers might be doing a lot more for doctors than just printing medical forms. This technology combined with microneedles could create a drug patch that might replace hypodermic needles.