Like HowStuffWorks on Facebook!

10 Ways to Spice up Your Sex Life After Baby

        Health | Sexuality

9
Work Your Kegels
Strengthening pelvic floor muscles with Kegel exercises also helps reduce your risk of urinary incontinence.
Strengthening pelvic floor muscles with Kegel exercises also helps reduce your risk of urinary incontinence.
DCL

Working out your body is important and don't forget to include your pelvic floor muscles. Pelvic floor muscles support your uterus, bladder and bowels, and pregnancy and childbirth weaken them. Kegel exercises will help. The stronger your pelvic floor muscles are, the more strongly they'll contract during an orgasm.

First, find your pelvic floor muscles -- one of the most common ways is to try to stop the flow of urine as you go to the bathroom (don't make this a habit, though, because fiddling with your urine flow may put you at risk for urinary tract infections). The muscles that allow you to do this are the muscles you want to work out.

To perform Kegels, pretend you're stopping the urine flow. Squeeze those muscles for about 10 seconds, rest for 10 seconds and repeat. If 10 seconds is too long, try three or five to begin with -- practicing a set of 10 Kegels three times a day will have your pelvic floor muscles in shape in about six to 12 weeks. And since no one can tell you're doing them, you can pretty much do Kegels whenever you feel like it -- while you're in the car, checking e-mail or even standing in line at the store.

Added bonus: strengthening pelvic floor muscles with Kegel exercises also helps reduce your risk of (as well as help treat) urinary incontinence. No one feels sexy when she leaks a little urine every time she laughs.


More to Explore