Musculoskeletal System

Bones and muscles -- the musculoskeletal system -- are what make the body move. Learn how every movement of the body is the result of the coordination of bones, muscles, tendons, and ligaments.


Careful with that chopping knife! If you lose a fingertip, it's probably gone forever. With kids, however, that's not always the case. Why is that?

How does a 97-pound weakling become the World's Most Perfectly Developed Man, as Charles Atlas did? Through the sport known as bodybuilding. Here are 10 of the greatest, most well-known bodybuilders to grace the stage.

In a way, your spine is the keystone that holds your body together. Since it has so many important jobs, it has to develop in exactly the right way. How does this happen?

If you still want to be spry after a few decades of birthdays have passed, then sit up straight (literally) and pay attention. We've got 10 tips to keep you in action into your sunset years.

Babies have adorable smiles and teeny tiny fingers, but there's a persistent rumor that these new, tiny humans don't have kneecaps. What's the story of a baby's bones?

If you didn't have bones, you'd be puddled on the floor like a jellyfish with skin -- and your ability to impress people on the dancefloor would be severely compromised. What else are skeletons for, besides decorating your house for Halloween?

Oh, to be a kid again. Plenty of summer vacation, plenty of mud puddles and plenty of osteoblasts? There's a reason your kid can spring back from any injury while you're laid up for weeks.

Unfortunately for him, Humpty Dumpty was not blessed with the human skeletal system. Why can your skeleton do what all the king's horses and all the king's men can't?

How could a high-five or a handshake lead to a wrist fracture? People with osteogenesis imperfecta must carefully consider these seemingly innocent actions to prevent broken bones.

Can humans regrow fingers? Fetuses can regrow almost anything that gets damaged while in the womb. But can adult humans can regrow fingers?

Exoskeletons normally cover insects, not humans. Why would a human ever want one? Is the possibility of an exoskeleton for humans just around the corner?

Muscles are one of those things that most of us take completely for granted, but they're the body's engine. Without our muscles, we couldn't walk or talk -- and our blood would stop flowing.

If you've ever laced your fingers together, turned your palms away from you, bent your fingers back and heard a loud crack or pop, you know what knuckle-popping sounds like. So, what would happen if you popped your knuckles all the time?