Medicine

Medicine has to do with diseases and conditions that affect the entire body. In this section, learn about testing and treatment plans including the medicines used to prevent and treat a range of diseases and conditions.

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Machine learning, or artificial intelligence, might just save us from bacterial infections in the future.

By Jesslyn Shields

Medicare supplement plans, or Medigap, covers costs that Medicare doesn't. But there are a lot of things to beware off before you buy one.

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

You've probably seen the ads for drugs to treat depression, and the warnings that they may cause suicidal thoughts. But why would that be?

By Alia Hoyt

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If you've got a pain in your head or body, you'll probably reach for whatever's in your medicine cabinet. But is it really the right treatment? One size doesn't fit all – we explain the differences in pain relievers.

By Alia Hoyt

Doctors in the U.S. still perform about 500,000 surgeries each year with his life-saving technique.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Performing CPR on a woman means that, yes, there will be some hand-to-breast contact. Womanikin is designed to help reduce the stress and hesitation.

By Cherise Threewitt

Doctors' waiting rooms often have signs that a fee will be charged for no-shows or late arrivals. So, should patients ask doctors for reimbursement when they have to wait a long time?

By Alia Hoyt

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He was able to detect a significant number of early cancers with his method, paving the way for the first mass screening program, launched in Tennessee in 1928.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

When you feel like you're between a rock and a hard place, a stool softener could get you out of a jam.

By Loraine Fick

We're all familiar with the lists of active ingredients on the products we use, but what are inactive ingredients and how can they affect you?

By Alia Hoyt

Laparoscopic surgery has become the preferred method of minimally invasive surgery. It involves making tiny incisions in the body, and doctors remove some organs via the belly button.

By Alia Hoyt

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Donating blood is critical to ensure ample blood supply across the U.S. But what steps does it take once you give?

By Shelley Danzy

Having blood drawn is a piece of cake for some people and a traumatic experience for others. Either way, being armed with information can only help make the process easier.

By Tara Yarlagadda

When you call 911 in the U.S., you expect an ambulance to come roaring to your aid in a matter of minutes. But how are ambulances dispatched — and why do they cost so much?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Making sure the bowels are moving is key to monitoring health after surgery.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

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New research from the American of Pediatrics suggests an alarming number of parents are sharing antibiotics that were originally prescribed for their children — and this is bad news for all of us.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Forget the knife and take a pill instead?

By Chris Opfer

Conventional wisdom has long dictated that older people should take a small dose of aspirin each day for their cardiovascular health. A huge new drug trial disagrees.

By Jesslyn Shields

Flexible electronics have enabled a team at Tufts University to create a bandage that not only monitors wounds, but delivers treatment as well.

By Laurie L. Dove

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The new 3D color scans look like cross sections from a vividly realistic anatomical model, revealing great detail and true-to-life color.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The study, led by Boston Children's Hospital, was successful at getting mice with spinal cord injuries to walk again.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The intent of Right to Try is to make the process of obtaining last-ditch, potentially life-saving drugs easier for terminally ill patients by avoiding FDA strictures altogether.

By Carrie Tatro

The FDA already has a program that does almost exactly the same thing for patients, but is anyone aware of it?

By Carrie Tatro

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Chemotherapy was an accidental discovery from World War II. But is it any different in the 21st century?

By Alia Hoyt

There's actually a need for donated stool to help treat certain intestinal infections. But not everyone is qualified for the task.

By Alia Hoyt