Medicine

Medicine has to do with diseases and conditions that affect the entire body. In this section, learn about testing and treatment plans including the medicines used to prevent and treat a range of diseases and conditions.


The groundbreaking surgery opens up exciting options for other cancer patients, injured war veterans and people who have otherwise experienced severe pelvic injuries.

VR's good for way more than just games these days. It's been used to treat autism, PTSD, depression and other conditions. Soon we could add paranoia to that list.

Failings of the medical system are to blame for almost 10 percent of all deaths, and it's because we're not set up to properly account for them, the study suggests.

The current U.S. recommendation is to get a tetanus shot every 10 years. Will this new study change CDC guidelines?

About eight percent of the U.S. population will have post-traumatic stress disorder in their lifetime. Combining verbal therapy with MDMA could help those millions.

It used to an apple that kept doctors away, but researchers have found a Streptococcus strain we could recruit to fight for us against its cavity-causing cousin.

Fighting off tumors in advanced-stage cancer patients isn’t easy, but a team of scientists in London have a vaccine that may do the trick.

A new urine test can sniff out prostate cancer — and it's more accurate and less invasive than the traditional test.

Why are residents of Colorado responding to their recreational marijuana access differently than out-of-towners?

Right now if you need a new organ, you have to wait around until one is available. A new development puts us closer to a future where living tissue can be made to order.

If we look at not just our own cells, but the microbiome of bacteria living in and on us, humans could better understand our own bodies.

In the U.S., drug companies can't legally pay doctors to prescribe their drugs, but they do find ways to put money in doctors' pockets. Will the ACA change this?

It's not easy to treat a person who's hemorrhaging. Especially if that person isn't near a hospital. A cool, new tool could change the outcome of that scenario.

A study shows gastric bypass surgery helps 'skinny' gut microbes flourish. Could this pave the way for a weight-loss pill?

Sometimes doctors are just too late. What if diseases could be identified before symptoms strike?

Docs are no different from the rest of us — they bring their unconscious biases into the workplace. But is there a way to lessen the impact of these biases on patients?

Goodbye, scary needles! Microneedle patches could ease needle fears and help boost vaccination rates.

It may sound crazy initially — using a tooth to repair eyesight — but it's a very real surgery with a pretty impressive track record.

Bee stings hurt, so it seems like an odd proposition to get them on purpose. Believe it or not, the venom that makes that sting may also benefit humans in therapy.

You've got chest pain you can't ignore, so you head off to the emergency room. On the way, you notice the hospital posts its ER wait time on a billboard. But is the posted time really how long you'll wait?

You really liked that ER doctor who stitched up your arm. That is until you got your bill. Turns out the doctor was out of your insurance network, even though the hospital's ER is in network. How does that happen?

We all know a trip to the emergency room is never quick, but sometimes the ER is so jam-packed that you think that you're in the country's busiest ER. So just where is America's busiest ER? Well, it depends on who you ask.

You just broke your arm, and you're flat broke. But you don't worry about getting medical treatment, because the doctors and nurses in the ER have to treat everyone who walks through the door. Or do they?

Help! You just cut your hand while chopping vegetables. On the way to the hospital you cringe because you know that ER bill is going to be unbelievable. Why is that?

During a medical emergency, your only thought is getting to the ER as fast as possible. The last thing on your mind is figuring out what kind of insurance the doctor accepts. We can help.