Medicine

Medicine has to do with diseases and conditions that affect the entire body. In this section, learn about testing and treatment plans including the medicines used to prevent and treat a range of diseases and conditions.

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Despite a much-loved article that said doctors died in hospitals less frequently than their patients, new research shows no difference.

By Kathryn Whitbourne

The current U.S. recommendation is to get a tetanus shot every 10 years. Will this new study change CDC guidelines?

By Alia Hoyt

About eight percent of the U.S. population will have post-traumatic stress disorder in their lifetime. Combining verbal therapy with MDMA could help those millions.

By Christian Sager

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It used to an apple that kept doctors away, but researchers have found a Streptococcus strain we could recruit to fight for us against its cavity-causing cousin.

By Laurie L. Dove

Why are residents of Colorado responding to their recreational marijuana access differently than out-of-towners?

By Christopher Hassiotis

A study shows gastric bypass surgery helps 'skinny' gut microbes flourish. Could this pave the way for a weight-loss pill?

By Alia Hoyt

Docs are no different from the rest of us — they bring their unconscious biases into the workplace. But is there a way to lessen the impact of these biases on patients?

By Alia Hoyt

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It may sound crazy initially — using a tooth to repair eyesight — but it's a very real surgery with a pretty impressive track record.

By Nathan Chandler

Bee stings hurt, so it seems like an odd proposition to get them on purpose. Believe it or not, the venom that makes that sting may also benefit humans in therapy.

By Maria Trimarchi

You've got chest pain you can't ignore, so you head off to the emergency room. On the way, you notice the hospital posts its ER wait time on a billboard. But is the posted time really how long you'll wait?

By Kate Kershner

You really liked that ER doctor who stitched up your arm. That is until you got your bill. Turns out the doctor was out of your insurance network, even though the hospital's ER is in network. How does that happen?

By Kate Kershner

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We all know a trip to the emergency room is never quick, but sometimes the ER is so jam-packed that you think that you're in the country's busiest ER. So just where is America's busiest ER? Well, it depends on who you ask.

By Kate Kershner

You just broke your arm, and you're flat broke. But you don't worry about getting medical treatment, because the doctors and nurses in the ER have to treat everyone who walks through the door. Or do they?

By Kate Kershner

Help! You just cut your hand while chopping vegetables. On the way to the hospital you cringe because you know that ER bill is going to be unbelievable. Why is that?

By Kate Kershner

During a medical emergency, your only thought is getting to the ER as fast as possible. The last thing on your mind is figuring out what kind of insurance the doctor accepts. We can help.

By Kate Kershner

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You've got health insurance. Congratulations! But good luck finding a primary care doctor. There are a lot fewer of them these days, so you may end up using that shiny, new insurance card in an emergency room.

By Kate Kershner

We all know what to do in case of a medical emergency (get to the ER), but are you really qualified to recognize a true emergency when it happens?

By Kate Kershner

You have to go to the ER, but you don't have health insurance. You're not worried, though, because emergency rooms have to treat everyone who walks through the doors. But does that mean you get out of paying the costs you incur?

By Kate Kershner

When a winter storm, tornado or hurricane happens, people start flooding emergency rooms (ERs) at hospitals. So, if the hospital didn't know how to handle the influx, chaos would break out.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

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Sometimes it's a lot easier to just take that expired cold medicine than run out to the drugstore when you're feeling sick. But are those expired meds even working? Or, worse, are they causing you harm?

By Jennifer Sellers

If you get stung by a jellyfish, you might be reminded of how some friends on a certain '90s TV show handled it. Should you follow suit?

By Laurie L. Dove

There's an assortment of medications on the market to treat depression. But many of them are also effective for managing other health issues.

By Maria Trimarchi

Salamanders regrow their tails. Starfish can grow new arms. When is it our turn? Let's take a look at what science has in the works.

By Kate Kershner

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Addiction isn't pretty. It ruins health and tears apart families — and we don't have any sure-fire way to cure it. When we're examining the possibilities, how do lasers measure up as a possible solution?

By Kate Kershner

Microorganisms aren't all bad. Can we fight fire with fire and pit good bacteria against the bad ones? Yes, but maybe not the way you think.

By Kate Kershner