Medicine

Medicine has to do with diseases and conditions that affect the entire body. In this section, learn about testing and treatment plans including the medicines used to prevent and treat a range of diseases and conditions.


You've got health insurance. Congratulations! But good luck finding a primary care doctor. There are a lot fewer of them these days, so you may end up using that shiny, new insurance card in an emergency room.

We all know what to do in case of a medical emergency (get to the ER), but are you really qualified to recognize a true emergency when it happens?

You have to go to the ER, but you don't have health insurance. You're not worried, though, because emergency rooms have to treat everyone who walks through the doors. But does that mean you get out of paying the costs you incur?

When you're headed to the ER, you're probably a little too busy to ponder the difference between it and a trauma center. But there are differences between the two that you should know.

When a winter storm, tornado or hurricane happens, people start flooding emergency rooms (ERs) at hospitals. So, if the hospital didn't know how to handle the influx, chaos would break out.

Sometimes it's a lot easier to just take that expired cold medicine than run out to the drugstore when you're feeling sick. But are those expired meds even working? Or, worse, are they causing you harm?

If you get stung by a jellyfish, you might be reminded of how some friends on a certain '90s TV show handled it. Should you follow suit?

There's an assortment of medications on the market to treat depression. But many of them are also effective for managing other health issues.

Salamanders regrow their tails. Starfish can grow new arms. When is it our turn? Let's take a look at what science has in the works.

Addiction isn't pretty. It ruins health and tears apart families — and we don't have any sure-fire way to cure it. When we're examining the possibilities, how do lasers measure up as a possible solution?

Microorganisms aren't all bad. Can we fight fire with fire and pit good bacteria against the bad ones? Yes, but maybe not the way you think.

We transplant DNA already in the form of blood transfusions and bone marrow transplants. But just DNA? That's a different story.

Soon, we'll all be carrying around little vials of neurons like ibuprofen in our purses. Well. Not SOON soon. But we've definitely made progress in recent years.

It can be hard to tell whether an injury, illness or other troubling symptom warrants a trip to the ER. While you should always err on the side of caution and go if you're unsure, these tips will make your decision easier.

In 2014, 29,532 people in the U.S. received organ transplants, like hearts, lungs and kidneys. What if you wanted a whole new body for your head?

Working in the ER isn't easy, and emergency medical professionals deserve a ton of credit for doing excellent work in less-than-stellar circumstances. But inevitably, sometimes things go wrong. And when they do, what legal options do you have?

Doomsday preppers recommend stocking up for the collapse of civilization -- and that includes antibiotics. But if you're getting them without a prescription, you're getting the veterinary kind.

When you're sick, sleep is one of the best things you can do to get better. But when you're several days into your antibiotics and still dragging, what's the cause: your illness or its cure?

Antibiotics save lives. But broad-spectrum antibiotics can really do a number on the delicate ecosystem in your intestines -- and the recovery time may surprise you.

The more we study obesity, the clearer it becomes that the condition is not always as simple as too many calories and not enough movement. There's a new area that researchers are studying to understand the causes of obesity: antibiotics.

Once you've gotten a sunburn during a course of antibiotics, you'll never forget the SPF again. But why would they lead to a burn in the first place?

Antibiotics are great at curing infections. But some are also great at upsetting your stomach and causing diarrhea. Which ones do we need to watch out for?

With some infections, it's hard to tell what may be causing your illness. And if it's serious, there's no time to wait for test results. Enter the broad-spectrum antibiotic -- and the problems it brings with it.

Humans tend to be forgetful when it comes to things that don't really interest us. Where did we put our keys? Did we take that last dose of antibiotics? We don't know about your keys, but we can help you with the penicillin question.

We've been hearing about tiny medical robots for decades. Where is this tiny dream team? Researchers promise these little guys are on the way -- and they might be even cooler than we thought.