Diet and Fitness

HowStuffWorks offers guidance for developing an exercise routine that will help you get in shape and stay healthy. Learn about diet and fitness and get tips from professional trainers.

Learn More

During this time of social distancing and isolation, many hot yoga aficionados are craving the heat of the hot yoga studio, but our experts say you can create that heat at home.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Staying fit is more important now than ever. Regular exercise decreases tension, and elevates and stabilize moods — all things we need at times like this. So how do we stay fit from home?

By Carrie Whitney, Ph.D.

Your friends might be talking up this way of eating and have you curious as to whether it may work for you. We talk to the experts to find out, as well as give you our personal experience.

By Alia Hoyt

Advertisement

Some U.S. doctors and Asian American health advocates are calling for a lower BMI cutoff for Asian Americans, mainly because of health concerns about Type 2 diabetes.

By Tara Yarlagadda

The rumor mill says that if a person were to intentionally swallow a tapeworm their excess pounds would simply melt away. But what's the truth about the 'tapeworm diet'?

By Ed Grabianowski & Alia Hoyt

Hypertrophy is just a super-science-y way to say you're building muscle. And there are lots of ways to do it.

By John Donovan

The ubiquitous and beautiful Sanskrit word has meaning beyond the mat.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Advertisement

Pushups are a great upper-body exercise that people often do wrong. So what's the right way to perform a pushup and what are some variations?

By Alia Hoyt

Squatting has a ton of benefits and can actually strengthen a lot of your inactive muscle groups.

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

The keto diet is high in fat and low in carbs — ideal for quick weight loss, but not necessarily for keeping it off.

By Shaun Chavis

They're probably the bane of your middle school memories. So why do we still subject kids to these humiliating physical fitness tests?

By Michelle Konstantinovsky

Advertisement

Lots of people believe that a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar a day helps to speed weight loss. But what does science say?

By Dave Roos

A small study found that just by eating breakfast later and dinner earlier, people could lose twice as much body fat as those who did not. But could they stick with this diet?

By Melanie Radzicki McManus

A lectin-free diet bans beans, grains and even some veggies. So is this the next cure-all fad diet?

By Shaun Chavis

It turns out that people who are both healthy and obese are rarer than you might think.

By Alia Hoyt

Advertisement

Compared to sports drinks, bananas might be tops at helping us power through workouts and heal faster on the other end.

By Jesslyn Shields

Why is it so hard to keep weight off after losing it? One study suggests it's because your body wants you to put it back on.

By Dave Roos

New research shows going gluten free may not be all it's cracked up to be.

By Chris Opfer

A quick workout before or between flights would be a nice way to get energized, especially if there was a gym conveniently located at your terminal. So why aren't there more gyms inside U.S. airports?

By John Donovan

Advertisement

Hot yoga may not be as beneficial as once thought, a new study suggests.

By Robert Lamb

Workout trends are changing, as younger people are less into the gender divide of classes for women and weightlifting for men.

By Alia Hoyt

There are nude bike rides, naked yoga sessions and even the occasional bare-it-all Crossfit sesh. Would our bodies be more efficient without clothes getting in the way?

By Laurie L. Dove

A study showed that weight loss messages are more likely to work when both are actions ("eat more veggies," "do more exercise") rather than if one is an action and the other is an inaction ("eat more veggies," "eat less fat").

By Alia Hoyt

Advertisement

It's a popular dieting trend but in this 2017 long-term study, the first of its kind, researchers found mixed results on the effectiveness of alternate-day fasting.

By Alia Hoyt

Worrying can be detrimental to a person's health, but — in the right amounts — it can also promote well-being.

By Shelley Danzy