Great Psychologists

Great psychologists include famous psychoanalysts like Freud and Jung as well as lesser known psychiatrists. Learn how great psychologists have contributed to our knowledge of psychology.


Sigmund Freud is considered the father of psychoanalysis, although today many of his theories are viewed unfavorably. Why is his legacy still so important?

Binswanger, Ludwig (1881-1966), a Swiss psychiatrist, sought to understand people as total human beings.

Kraepelin, Emil (1856-1926) was a German psychiatrist who pioneered investigation into the physical causes of mental illness.

Laing, R. D. (1927-1989) was a Scottish psychiatrist whose work centered on schizophrenia and its causes.

Rush, Benjamin (1745-1813), an American physician and a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Sullivan, Harry Stack (1892-1949) was an American psychiatrist and a leader in the development of personality theory.

Wagner-Jauregg, Julius (1857-1940) was an Austrian psychiatrist and neurologist who discovered an effective treatment for general paresis, also called syphilitic meningoencephalitis.

Klein, Melanie (1882-1960) was an Austrian-born psychoanalyst who pioneered the field of child psychoanalysis and devised some of the first techniques of play therapy.

Winnicott, Donald Woods (1896-1971) was a British psychoanalyst and specialist in child development.

Allport, Gordon W. (1897-1967) was an American psychologist known for his research in human personality.

Burt, Cyril (1883-1971), a British psychologist, made important contributions in the areas of statistical analysis, intelligence testing, and juvenile delinquency.

Carr, Harvey (1873-1954), an American psychologist and university administrator, had a profound influence in the field of American psychology.

Cattell, James McKeen (1860-1944), an American psychologist, had widespread influence on the scientific community.

Clark, Kenneth Bancroft (1914-2005) was an American psychologist and educator.

Bono, Edward de (1933- ), a Maltese psychologist, is considered by many to be the leading authority in the field of creative thinking and the teaching of thinking as a skill.

Ebbinghaus, Hermann (1850-1909) was a German experimental psychologist who performed highly original work in the study of memory and association.

Eysenck, Hans (1916-1997) was a German-born British psychologist who criticized conventional psychotherapy.

Harlow, Harry Frederick (1905-1981) was an American psychologist. His studies of the social behavior of monkeys provided new understanding of human behavior and development.

Hull, Clark Leonard (1884-1952), an American psychologist, expressed psychological theory in mathematical terms.

Jones, Ernest (1879-1958), a British psychologist, was a pioneer in his field.

Lashley, Karl Spencer (1890-1958) was an American psychologist who researched the correlation between brain function and learning.

Lewin, Kurt (1890-1947), a German-born American psychologist, developed the field theory of behavior and helped found modern experimental social psychology.

Maslow, Abraham Harold (1908-1970), an American psychologist, is best known for launching humanistic psychology, which emphasizes the independent value of human beings and their ability to develop to their full potential.

McDougall, William (1871-1938) was a British psychologist who founded the school of purposive psychology, which suggested that humans and animals act for specific purposes, with the actions directed toward achieving certain goals.

Overstreet, Harry and Bonaro, United States authors, husband and wife. Most of their books are discussions of various aspects of contemporary sociology, psychology, or philosophy in a popular vein.