Medicine

Medicine has to do with diseases and conditions that affect the entire body. In this section, learn about testing and treatment plans including the medicines used to prevent and treat a range of diseases and conditions.

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Microorganisms aren't all bad. Can we fight fire with fire and pit good bacteria against the bad ones? Yes, but maybe not the way you think.

By Kate Kershner

We transplant DNA already in the form of blood transfusions and bone marrow transplants. But just DNA? That's a different story.

By Kate Kershner

Soon, we'll all be carrying around little vials of neurons like ibuprofen in our purses. Well. Not SOON soon. But we've definitely made progress in recent years.

By Kate Kershner

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It can be hard to tell whether an injury, illness or other troubling symptom warrants a trip to the ER. While you should always err on the side of caution and go if you're unsure, these tips will make your decision easier.

By Karen Kirkpatrick

In 2014, 29,532 people in the U.S. received organ transplants, like hearts, lungs and kidneys. What if you wanted a whole new body for your head?

By Meisa Salaita

Working in the ER isn't easy, and emergency medical professionals deserve a ton of credit for doing excellent work in less-than-stellar circumstances. But inevitably, sometimes things go wrong. And when they do, what legal options do you have?

By Karen Kirkpatrick

Doomsday preppers recommend stocking up for the collapse of civilization -- and that includes antibiotics. But if you're getting them without a prescription, you're getting the veterinary kind.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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When you're sick, sleep is one of the best things you can do to get better. But when you're several days into your antibiotics and still dragging, what's the cause: your illness or its cure?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Antibiotics save lives. But broad-spectrum antibiotics can really do a number on the delicate ecosystem in your intestines -- and the recovery time may surprise you.

By Patrick J. Kiger

The more we study obesity, the clearer it becomes that the condition is not always as simple as too many calories and not enough movement. There's a new area that researchers are studying to understand the causes of obesity: antibiotics.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Once you've gotten a sunburn during a course of antibiotics, you'll never forget the SPF again. But why would they lead to a burn in the first place?

By Patrick J. Kiger

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Antibiotics are great at curing infections. But some are also great at upsetting your stomach and causing diarrhea. Which ones do we need to watch out for?

By Patrick J. Kiger

With some infections, it's hard to tell what may be causing your illness. And if it's serious, there's no time to wait for test results. Enter the broad-spectrum antibiotic -- and the problems it brings with it.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Humans tend to be forgetful when it comes to things that don't really interest us. Where did we put our keys? Did we take that last dose of antibiotics? We don't know about your keys, but we can help you with the penicillin question.

By Patrick J. Kiger

We've been hearing about tiny medical robots for decades. Where is this tiny dream team? Researchers promise these little guys are on the way -- and they might be even cooler than we thought.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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If you've ever dealt with sciatica or degenerative disc disease, you know the unique agony of back pain. Spine surgery has traditionally been a little dicey. Here's what researchers are working on to make it better.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Oh, you can't regrow your own limbs like a starfish? You soon may be able to. That's the promise of regenerative medicine, at least, a field that seeks to help you replace and regenerate your own body parts.

By Patrick J. Kiger

If Florence Nightingale illustrates the illustrious history of nurses, who will represent the future? That man or woman will have an entire new health care world to inhabit.

By Patrick J. Kiger

Robotic surgery doesn't mean Rosie from "The Jetsons" is going to get it. Instead, these high-tech bots let surgeons make the tiniest, most precise movements to limit tissue damage. But even now, researchers are dreaming up better robot inventions.

By Patrick J. Kiger

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When it comes to your own body, you generally don't want to hear the words "Open 'er up." Minimally invasive surgery is a modern blessing. As researchers innovate, what can patients expect?

By Patrick J. Kiger

Family medicine isn't just for kids and their parents. The idea is that a physician sticks with you from birth to death, treating your whole body throughout your whole life. And it's changing with the times.

By Patrick J. Kiger

You cut yourself prepping dinner. It's after business hours. But should you really take that laceration to the emergency room? Maybe not.

By Maria Trimarchi

"Misbehaving periods" doesn't appear on any list of medication side effects, but as many women can attest, menstrual irregularities aren't uncommon when you're taking antibiotics. The culprit may not be the drugs.

By Alison Cooper

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Some medications are high-maintenance about what foods you pair them with. A commonly prescribed heart drug, for example, can't be with black licorice. There are also certain antibiotics that just don't go well with a glass of milk.

By Alison Cooper

Some antibiotics are a little too good at cleansing your system. As in, you might find yourself literally running to the bathroom to deal with the side effects. Can probiotics solve the problem?

By Alison Cooper