Diseases and Conditions

Know how to prevent, treat and control the symptoms of various diseases and medical conditions. We explain what's happening in your body when disease strikes, and what you can do to feel better faster.


We often feel unsure about what to say to a friend with a serious illness, so we fall back on clichés. Here are some better ways to help .

Many women dread the squishing of their chest during their annual checkup. Is there another way to get the same results in a more breast-friendly way?

If you're moving from one city to another, pack some extra tissues because it's true: Seasonal allergies can flare up when you relocate and are exposed to new allergens.

Researchers and doctors know some cancers in teens have skyrocketed since 1975. They just don't know why.

The branding on cigarette boxes steers smokers who pick up the packs. But without it, smokers aren't as keen on taking a drag.

A first-of-its-kind study looks at the physical stresses of being a tattoo artist.

Updated quarantine regulations which would give federal health officials more leeway to detain sick people have some legal and civil rights experts concerned.

This is what happens when fearless knitters take on breast cancer one stitch at a time.

This flu season, beware of coughers, sneezers ... and loud talkers?

Sure, the carrier mosquitoes are in the U.S., and so is the disease. But other factors will stave off a widespread incident, experts say.

Zika virus acts weird for a mosquito-borne illness. The newest twist is that it can survive for a surprisingly long time on a hard, nonporous surface.

Sometimes the nose knows. What advances are being made in detecting diseases by scent?

Cat scratch fever’s having another day in the spotlight and this time it has nothing to do with rocker Ted Nugent. So, should you be scared of your kitty?

Contradicting earlier advice, the study found that introducing these foods earlier is better.

Is September too early and December too late? Or does the timing matter less than you might think for a flu shot?

Relieving sinus pressure isn't rocket science, but when your head's clogged up, it can feel just as important.

The FDA is recommending that all blood donations start being tested for Zika virus in the next 12 weeks. But what about the blood already on hand? What happens to that?

For most people, sinuses are only really a problem in the spring and fall, when allergies, colds and flu take over. But for an unlucky few, sinus pressure and pain come with the job.

Throw some germy surfaces into a mix of dry air and a pressurized cabin, and you have a recipe for sinus misery.

When your sinuses are clogged and you can't breathe, it might help to know how those cavities work. Over-the-counter decongestants help, too.

One in 12 U.S. adults has asthma, says the CDC. That's a lot of people who might be very interested in a new treatment for this serious health problem.

Naming a disease after a person makes it more memorable than giving it a bland technical moniker. It's also a good way to pay tribute to its discoverer. Who were the people that gave their names to Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and other diseases?

There may be more going on with your body than just itchy eyes and a runny nose when you're dealing with seasonal allergies, a small new study finds.

People with non-celiac wheat sensitivity have a weakened intestinal barrier, which leads to a systemic immune response and a non-gluten protein may be to blame.